All Goode: Apostrophe’s

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Last night Kim and I attended an art reception for local artist Jon Goode.  He said his girlfriend surprised him with the show, titled Decades.  She had unearthed some of his earlier works (in attic storage) and paired them with ones he has on display in his bookshop near my friend Kim’s hair salon down the road from me in Eastwood.

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The result was this inspiring show of colorful mixed-media pieces of various sizes.  There was an amazing food spread, a fully stocked bar complete with homemade wine labelled specifically for the show (!!!) and a DJ spinning vinyl.

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The last time I had visited Apostrophe’s on Oak Street in Syracuse, New York, it was for Davana Robedee’s exhibit.  Now that it is spring, the gallery is very bright in the evening in comparison to Davana’s opening and so, it was a very different vibe.  Curator Holly Wilson had originally planned the space to be a showcase for Syracuse University student artists looking for a venue to begin their careers.  She is now expanding to include the local Syracuse scene.  Artists, like Jon, like me, who can rent the space for one to three week shows for a one-man gig or group showing.

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It is a wonderful space and I may take her up on the offer.  There is availabilitity this summer.  If you are interested, contact Holly at yourfriendholly@gmail.com.

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Jon’s show runs through next week.  Hours of operation are limited, but I believe you can get a private viewing by contacting Holly’s email or galleryapostropheS@gmail.com.

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Measuring Up

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The Art Galleries at Syracuse University are designed to facilitate education.  In other words, it’s a teaching museum.  Professors require students to go to there – to critique the art/learn how to judge a work of art.  Students journal about experiences for classes, attend the receptions and lectures, and even work there (which has to be the greatest work-study gig).

Last year, former Director Domenic Iocono mentioned it was the reason artists like Jasper Johns, James Rosenquist and Kiki Smith wanted to collaborate by sharing their work with our community, enhancing the walls of the spaces with their respective visions.

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In this season’s first exhibition, Not a Metric Matters, the university galleries led by new Director and Chief Curator Vanja Malloy, Ph.D. hosts its own – the School of Visual & Performing Arts faculty.  It is an opportunity to showcase their talent, yes, and also turn the tables on the critiquing process allowing the professors to show students how it’s really done.

Margie Hughto has been affiliated with the university for many, many years.  When I spoke to her last month, she said teaching is still fun and so, she will continue to share her expertise with students for many years to come.

Her ceramic and found object work is exquisite.  It is perfection in editing – selecting just the right found object pieces to coordinate with the ceramic pieces.  The work alludes to the recent discarded and forgotten in terms of technology.

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The thought provoking concepts aside, Hughto’s artwork screams of her strength of character.  She finds beauty in every angle, in each piece fused as one.  They are signatures of her style while continuing to surprise and delight us, continuing a growth trajectory as an artist and that in itself is the lesson.

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Holly Greenberg has isolated grief in this productive series of drawings.  These pieces resonated with me – as you know my father recently passed away and his belongings are still in the closets, his car in the driveway at Mom’s house.  Using these ordinary objects as memento gives them a lovingly somber power and isolating them in their compositions drives the message home.

It is curious how objects can retain the emotion of the spirit and Greenberg’s proficiency in rendering provides the elevation of their status.

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Ann Clarke‘s fiber artwork is marvelously original.  Texture is my thing and seeing monumental work on the walls creates a bold statement about time.  The fabrics are traditional, but the techniques are fresh and alive.  The hooked rug eye is really incredible in-person.  I love the idea of taking a method we all used in the past and formulating this new pattern, which seems to denote to me that someone is watching over me, loving me.

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Clarke’s statement does imply that she is the watchful eye for her ailing mother and that is a beautiful thing.  That the old becomes new again, and time is cyclical.

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Other teaching artists in this show –

Yasser Aggour, Cooper Battersby, Emily Vey Duke, Don Carr, Deborah Dohne, Heath Hanlin, Seyeon Lee, Sarah McCoubrey, Su Hyun Nam, Vasilios Papajoannu, James Ransome, Tom Sherman and Chris Wildrick

Their work takes dimension as paintings, drawings, photo-collage, video and installation – and all have something important to say within the context of their visualizations.

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There are more exhibits in the space, all curated by different people.  DJ Hellerman is the curator of this show.  He is the Art and Program Curator at the Everson Museum of Art and collaborates with SU’s Department of Transmedia.  I met him while stumbling into a critique of university students’ final exhibitions at Apostrophe’s.

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David Prince curated the display of former VPA faculty members.  As you know, I am an SU grad (B.F.A. ’85, M.S. ’93).  These professors are my people.  I absolutely loved Rodger Mack.  He was so devoted to building the sculpture department and his bronze sculptures are THE BEST!

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Seeing his hands portrayed by Jerome Witkin brought a tear to my eye.  There is so much love here, people.  Going to Syracuse University was a dream come true for me – I feel incredibly blessed to have been the first person in my family to ever go to a university –  and to see the professors being honored is such a gift.  They deserve every accolade.

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They were and are true working artists, not just people showing up to collect a paycheck.

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There’s lots more to see of these exhibits and the vast permanent collections.  It will all be on display until November 24, 2019.  There will be an art reception on Thursday, September 12, 2019 from 5 – 7 pm.  And Holly Greenberg will be giving a presentation in the adjacent Shemin Auditorium on Thursday, November 7, 2019 at 6:30 pm.

Syracuse University Art Galleries is located in the Shaffer Art Building on Syracuse University campus.  Free parking is available on Sundays and on Thursday evenings in the Q lot – or at least it was when I was there yesterday.  Call (315) 443-4097 for more information including hours of operation.  ❤

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Flowers, Tatts & China

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I have become a Transmedia groupie.

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Syracuse University Associate Professor Laura Heyman, guest Visiting-Artist and Instructor Ira Lombardia, and Everson Museum of Art Curator of Art and Programs DJ Hellerman led students through a critique tonight at Apostrophe’s Art Gallery, 1104 Oak Street, Syracuse, NY 13203.

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I was there a couple weeks ago for a similar event.  This time it was a joint showcase of work by Han Zhao and Hangyi Zhou.

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Han Zhao’s exhibit, Flowerbility, utilizes various media to showcase a single flower.  According to his artist statement, he creates on his I-Pad and laptop, which allows his ideas to flow freely and quickly.  There is joy to this ease.  His work ethic reminded me of artist Kiki Smith.  Last year, she visited Syracuse University and talked about coming at an idea from all angles.  I enjoyed the consistency of the image and saw how its use had implications and applications to interpreting and re-imagining business logos, taking the image to its unlimited potential.  That was exciting!

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I jumped into participating in Hangyi Zhou’s critique session.  What was I thinking, lol?  I guess the teacher in me couldn’t just be a fly on the wall.  I loved being a part of this adventure.  The artist’s four-piece photography exhibit, Chinese Tattooed Women, seemed rather simplistic until she shared some back-story.

What happens in China stays in China – except when young artists relate how their view of the world is tainted by a judgmentally governed society.  In this case, the notion that tattoos suggest disreputable character, specifically in regard to women.  Finding Chinese women courageous enough to pose for these photographs was quite an accomplishment, apparently.

Each model wears black and poses to portray their emotional connection to their respective tattoos, which are similarly inked in black and were all similarly executed in China.

This series seems to be in its gestation period, and a lot of what was said in the critique was thought-provoking in a helpful way.

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20190422_190221.jpgThank you, Transmedia gang, for including me.  This SU grad loves that Syracuse University art has expanded into the off-campus community.  Utilizing this unique gallery space for student exhibitions and holding receptions on Mondays is a win-win! ❤

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The Art of Fluidity

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Penny, Janine and I attended the Pop-up Video Installation and Performing Art exhibition at Apostrophe’s this evening.  (1100 Oak Street, Syracuse, New York)  It was a three-hour event.  Artist Yilu Yang from Shanghai, China is currently a graduate student in the Department of Transmedia at Syracuse University.

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Her show was titled Subconsciously Flowing Water.  Yilu’s interest in nature stems from a yearning to seek its innate tranquility, a sanctuary from the contemporary man-made life-in-the-fast-lane that has been her experience growing up in a big city.  Her films are self-portraits, depicting herself creating narratives that represent an intimacy with water, sand and the landscape of Earth while also acknowledging the customs, poetry and history of her heritage.

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Her colleagues, fellow students and friends gathered for a critique led by Laura Heyman, Associate Professor in the Department of Transmedia and D.J. Hellerman, Curator of Art & Programs at the Everson Museum of Art.  The Everson has one of the largest collections of Video Art in the nation (who knew?) and so, the museum works closely with the university to promote and guide students in their respective artistic journeys.

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Heyman asked what direction she felt her art was going, other than to be viewed in this gallery space?  Yilu Yang remained poised as she answered.  Her audience ventured closer to hear her soft spoken response.  She was clear in her vision, that her work is both personal and universal in that it allows the viewer to ponder the peaceful inner being while questioning their place in society.  It may become more political or not, depending on where it takes her – back to China or on an extended path around the world.

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I see it as the beauty in escape – that we can all benefit from unplugging from society and focusing on creating our own imaged histories, rewriting our realities and then revisiting ourselves in the physical.  In this way, we seek and find our true happiness.

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I see a lot of wonderful things in Yilu’s future.  She found a fit with Syracuse and with the United States – mainly, the freedom to express her vision with determined fluidity. ❤

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Allentown

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Left Hand Path is the title of the latest art exhibition hanging on the walls of Apostrophe’s  Art Gallery, 1100 Oak Street in Syracuse, New York.  Glendon Allen has curated an exhibition that includes ten artists –
Charles Buechner
Ray Madden
Star Daniels
Jessica Whitely
Dylan Allen
Risa Fox
Maggie Carlin
Sherry Spann Allen
Katelinn Carrier
Glendon Allen~ Curator

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It is a family affair.  Both Glendon and his brother Dylan are graduates of Syracuse University.  Their mom, Sherry Spann Allen, is a recently retired art teacher, as well as a nationally recognized abstract artist.  Their dad, Peter Allen, is a successful local graphic artist, painter and musician.  Alice, Dylan’s daughter, poses here with her artwork on the wall as well.  (She said it was a giraffe!)

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Left hand path is a term to describe the religious practice of dark magic.  (I Googled it.)  In this case, the artists are aligning with the feeling of being placed in the category of outsider.  Their emotions play a significant role in the production of their artwork.  Discord is at the center of this vibration, although the work here is a combination of action strokes and calm precision.  A sort of beautiful aesthetic meets the doom and gloom of the future kind of thing.

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The above prints were available for immediate sale, the rest can be purchased once the show comes down next week.  Apostrophe’s is open on Tuesdays and Thursdays and by appointment.

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Waterbear

 

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Davana Robedee just starts drawing.  She is inspired by natural forms – strands of hair, the motion of ocean waves….  The drawings take on a life of their own.  They become otherworldly, as though they are life-forms that can withstand space and time, much like the water bear, a microscopic species that can do just that!

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I went to the opening reception for The Millennia of the Waterbear last night at Apostrophe’s Art Gallery, 1100 Oak Street, Syracuse, New York.  Proprietors Holly Wilson and Allison Kirsch opened the venue to establish exhibition opportunities for college students and emerging artists.  They have currently booked art exhibits through this summer.

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The gallery is open Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 pm, Thursdays noon-2:00 pm, and by appointment – call (614) 209-7503 to schedule your visit!  This show ends on April 10, 2016.

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Davana is a recent graduate of Syracuse University.  She was my Encaustic professor at SU when I took the course in 2012.  Her work with the medium is superb.  At the gallery, she is displaying several functional lamps made of wire and wax.  LED light does not heat up and so the union is a successful one!  These lights looked more impressive as the sun went down.  They are soooo beautiful.  More so in person.  You must experience them!

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In addition, she has created a giant sculpture using plastic sheeting, as well as large panels of wax on plastic.  These pieces contain the same lyrical line quality as her drawings but with the addition of the textural surface.  Everything begs to be touched.  I found myself reaching out even though I know how fragile wax is (it needs, like, a thousand years to gain strength, unless there is enough damar resin in the mix). The whole show has a brilliant cohesiveness.

Davana is the real deal.  I love listening to her speak about her work.  There is a clear vision to her visual thoughts.  She really illuminates  just like her sculptures – she reveals an extraordinary depth of character.  The narrative provides understanding in a way that transcends the simple materials and abstraction.  I am really in awe of what she has accomplished here.

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davana

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Davana has another show scheduled for October 2016 in Old Forge, New York.  She starts creating new pieces soon including some wax items that will melt before our eyes.  Can’t wait to see where her mind takes us.  Wherever it is – I am loving the journey!

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