Category Archives: jewelry

Worlds Real & Imagined

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

20190816_201651.jpg

67466052_1618379614963363_7108555630935277568_o

We all trudged through an unbelievable (unreal/unimaginable, etc., lol) thunderstorm to flood the Edgewood Gallery (216 Tecumseh Road, Syracuse, New York 13224) tonight for the opening reception of a new exhibition called Worlds Real and Imagined.

Cheryl Chappell has gathered three etching artists – James Skvarch, John Fitzsimmons and Grant Silverstein and paired them with “architectural and organic” jewelry designer Sylvia Hayes-McKean, and “sculptural and functional” ceramist David MacDonald to create this incredible show, which will be up through September 27, 2019.

20190816_195326.jpg

Grant Silverstein‘s smaller pieces are perfect for the beginner art collector.  They are diminutive, yet intricately detailed and framed so beautifully.  Some are as low as $75! ❤

20190816_195753.jpg

20190816_195900.jpg

20190816_195903.jpg

20190816_195357.jpg

20190816_195746.jpg

I did not know that John Fitzsimmons was into etchings.  He is known for his award winning oil paintings – mainly portraits and landscapes.  So cool!  His response – “I’ve been busy!”  (working in his studio at the Delavan Center, 501 West Fayette Street, Syracuse, New York 13204). ❤

20190816_195833.jpg

20190816_201904.jpg

20190816_195732.jpg

James Skvarch is sporting a sling because of a left shoulder injury.  Good to know he is on the mend and that he is right handed!  He is such an incredibly proficient artist.  The depth and detail in his landscapes is really out of this world! Love! ❤

20190816_200001.jpg

20190816_201644.jpg

20190816_195756.jpg

20190816_200040.jpg

Sylvia Hayes-McKean is at it again, after a brief hiatus, a sculptor turned silversmith with modernly feminine earrings and necklaces that she creates at her studio in the Delavan Center.  Her grandson was a wonderful supporter/salesperson/helper tonight! So adorable. ❤

20190816_200016.jpg

20190816_195741.jpg

David MacDonald – he is the best!  I can’t say enough about how much I love his ceramics.  He told me that when he was in college, he was a painter and someone suggested he switch majors to art education, which instigated the left hand turn into taking necessary ceramics classes!  And the rest is history, lol.  Such an amazing person!  His positivity is infused in every single one of his pieces, whether decorative or functional. ❤

20190816_195344.jpg

20190816_200839.jpg

20190816_201644.jpg

20190816_195829.jpg

IMG_20190816_204852_207.jpg
#ootd – Milly top. BCBGMaxAzria shorts, Nine West booties, Coach crossbody
EDGEWOOD GALLERY
216 Tecumseh Rd. • Syracuse, NY 13224 • (315) 445-8111
Tuesday – Friday: 9:30 am – 6 pm     Saturday: 10 am – 2 pm     Sunday & Monday: closed

City Market

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

20190811_123004.jpg

20190811_123032.jpg

When I met Jason Alexander, I did that goofy Cinderella’s step-sister thing and asked him how he liked our Syracuse, New York weather.

He replied, “It sucks!”  This was after a performance of the play he’d directed at Syracuse Stage.  My friend and I looked at each other in an are-you-kidding-me glance because we both love it here, both love to hike whether in rain, snow, sleet or hail.  And our weather had been particularly great in June.

So funny – and that is why I don’t have a selfie with the Seinfeld alum.

20190811_123112.jpg

20190811_123153.jpg

Today’s weather is sheer perfection – a magnificent sunny and breezy day to explore the offerings at City Market.  Sponsored by the Everson Museum of Art (401 Harrison Street, Syracuse, NY 13202), the market is housed on the museum grounds around the fountains.

20190811_123208.jpg

20190811_123226.jpg

It takes place on the second Sunday of the month from 10 am – 4 pm.  There are two dates left before the season ends – Sunday, September 8, 2019 and Sunday, October 13, 2019.

20190811_123257.jpg

20190811_123341.jpg

There is a lot to peruse – jewelry, trinkets, clothing, food, furniture and flea market-y miscellaneousness.  And art, of course.

20190811_123358.jpg

20190811_123422.jpg

20190811_123622.jpg

Ken Nichols is there selling the mugs and rice bowls created in his studio at Clayscapes Pottery.

20190811_124243.jpg

Tyler Cagwin created Nostalgia Chocolate.  He manufactures the product here in Syracuse with international cocoa beans.  The flavors are rich and satisfying!  Gourmet chocolate with health benefits! (That’s a win-win).

20190811_124508.jpg

20190811_124519.jpg

20190811_124549.jpg

20190811_124623.jpg

20190811_124641.jpg

20190811_125129.jpg

20190811_125342.jpg

20190811_125208.jpg

I loved these ceramic pins and magnets created by Beckie Bortel of Beckie’s Pottery.  They have a substantial feel to them and they look like ginger snap cookies.  Great patina!

20190811_125349.jpg

20190811_125408.jpg

Terry Lynn Cameron is selling originals and prints of her colorful paintings. The prints are done on canvas, which is very cool.  I am really impressed with how she markets her product!  Some of the art has been adhered to sketchbooks and daily planners.  Love!

20190811_130617.jpg

20190811_131004.jpg

20190811_130226.jpg

20190811_131425.jpg

Lori Lizzio‘s work can be found as originals, prints and notecards.  They are ink and wash pieces of animals and figures.

20190811_131337.jpg

Syracuse does have beautiful weather, Jason Alexander, and beautiful people – and art.  It is satisfying and fun.  Really fun.  It doesn’t suck. ❤

20190811_122948.jpg

 

Art City

20190727_220906.jpg

20190727_220941.jpg

I visited with four friends in their tents on Montgomery Street yesterday.  They are all participating in the AmeriCU Syracuse Arts & Crafts Festival, which continues today from 10 am – 5 pm.  The festival occupies and includes four streets around Columbus Circle in downtown Syracuse, New York.

20190727_220924.jpg

Barbara Conte-Gaugel sells unique, handmade handbags and wallets.

20190727_221741.jpg

20190727_220849.jpg

John Oneal Heard (johnonealheard@gmail.com) is also a drummer.  His paintings on glass reference music.

20190727_221720.jpg

20190727_220803.jpg

20190727_220745.jpg

Charlie Sam creates whimsical illustrations on T-shirts.  They are known as having a “both cute and creepy” dichotomy.

20190727_220819.jpg

20190727_220959.jpg

20190727_221027.jpg

And, of course, Michelle DaRin.  I love her vibe – and feel privileged to be among her tribe. ❤

20190727_221012.jpg

 

The Thaw Legacy

20190713_170518.jpg

20190713_165243.jpg

Eugene and Clare Thaw began collecting Native American art in 1987 when they lived in Santa Fe, New Mexico.  They donated the collection to the Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown, New York where it currently resides in the downstairs gallery across from the Herb Ritts exhibition.

20190713_165658.jpg

20190713_165646.jpg

The life of Eugene V. Thaw is eloquently reviewed in an obituary written by Holland Carter for the New York Times, which I have included in this post.  It documents a man’s life-long passion for the arts.  His dedication to collecting, amassing more like, and also preserving and selling art is a gift to the world.

20190713_165617.jpg

In this case, American Indian clothing, jewelry, pottery, and both decorative and functional objects depict the powerfully dignified beauty of a culture/civilization.  Although the collection began in the Southwest, the Thaws expanded it to include every region of the US.  The pieces are exquisitely displayed via region.

I am especially drawn to the costume, the leather hides, the intricate beadwork and the colors.  Just fabulous!

Thank you, Mr. & Mrs. Thaw, for your life’s work and vision – preserving American history through the beauty of its art. ❤

The Fenimore Art Museum is open today 10am – 5pm.

5798 STATE HIGHWAY 80 (P.O.BOX 800)
COOPERSTOWN, NY 13326
607-547-1400
INFO@FENIMOREART.ORG

20190713_165717.jpg

20190713_165342.jpg

20190713_165338.jpg

20190713_165249.jpg

20190713_165709.jpg

****From the New York Times website

Eugene V. Thaw, Influential Art Collector and Dealer, Is Dead at 90

By Holland Cotter

January 5, 2018

He was born on Oct. 27, 1927, in Washington Heights in Manhattan. His father was a heating contractor, his mother a schoolteacher. They named him for the socialist leader Eugene Victor Debs, who had died the previous year.

As a young teenager, Mr. Thaw took drawing classes at the Art Students League on West 57th Street in Manhattan. But he did not pursue the hands-on practice of art.

“I can’t create the objects I crave to look at,” he later said, “so I collect them.”

After graduating from DeWitt Clinton High School in the Bronx at 15, he entered St. John’s College in Annapolis, Md., and began making day trips to art museums in nearby Washington.

Returning to New York in 1947, he took graduate classes in art history at Columbia University with Millard Meiss and Meyer Schapiro. He also followed the city’s contemporary-art scene, getting an early immersion in Pollock’s work at the Betty Parsons Gallery.

His closest institutional tie was to what is now the Morgan Libraryand Museum, which in the 1950s was one of the few New York museums to have a curator of drawings. In 1975, after the museum had expanded its acquisition parameters to include 19th-century work, the Thaws decided that the Morgan would be the recipient, in incremental allotments, of their ever-growing holdings. The Morgan exhibition “Drawn to Greatness: Master Drawings From the Thaw Collection,” which opened in September and closes on Sunday, marked the completion of the gift, encompassing more than 400 sheets.

 

Among them were works by modern and contemporary artists in whom Mr. Thaw took particular interest. In the 1950s, on summer vacations in East Hampton, N.Y., Clare Thaw had struck up a friendship with the painter Lee Krasner, Jackson Pollock’s widow. With Ms. Krasner’s cooperation, Mr. Thaw began preparing the multivolume Pollock catalogue raisonné, an annotated listing of all the artist’s known works, in the 1970s, hiring the art historian Francis V. O’Connor as co-author.

20190713_165313.jpg

20190713_165507.jpg

20190713_165540.jpg

20190713_165421.jpg

20190713_165418.jpg

***From the Fenimore website

EUGENE AND CLARE THAW: A MEMORIAL TRIBUTE

April 2 – December 31, 2019

Discover the most outstanding items from the Thaw Collection American Indian Art. Objects of transcendent beauty that span the continent—from the Arctic to the Southwest, and from the Eastern Woodlands to the Pacific West–encompassing close to 2,000 years of artistic tradition and innovation in North America.  

 

20190713_165301.jpg

20190713_165650.jpg

 

Retail as Art

20190501_192022.jpg

20190501_190507.jpg

20190501_193844.jpg

20190501_194356.jpg

20190501_190434.jpg

Pam and I ventured into Camillus, New York territory tonight to attend a Michelle DaRin Jewelry trunk show at Synple (70 Main Street, Camillus, New York 13031). Michelle’s new pieces are vibrantly bold yet feminine talismans.  Each piece is uniquely handmade.  I loved everything!!!

20190501_190410.jpg

20190501_190413.jpg

20190501_192038.jpg

20190501_192053.jpg

This quaint village shoppe is the brainchild of fine artist, art therapist, stationery designer, mother and retailer Kelly Landau.  The merchandising is picture perfect.

20190501_190235.jpg

20190501_190308.jpg

20190501_190220.jpg

Synple is a comfortable nook in the heart of the village where you will find friendly people who are passionate about their merchandise – housewares, clothing (Free People is a mainstay), jewelry (including a selection of Michelle DaRin pieces), candles, soaps and all sorts of amazing gifts, treats and stationery.

20190501_190146.jpg

20190501_191138.jpg

The Made in the Deep South items are currently 50% off until they are gone.  I want that beige cowhide bracelet with the crystal jewel!

20190501_191356.jpg

20190501_191145.jpg

20190501_192053.jpg

Hours of operation are Wednesday – Saturday 10:00 am – 4:00 pm.  Kelly is currently working on updating the store’s website.  For more information on merchandise and future events such as this one with Michelle, give their Facebook page a LIKE.  Here is the link. 

20190501_191432.jpg

20190501_193636.jpg

20190501_190316.jpg

Next up for Michelle – a show at The Finger Lakes Academy of Decorative Arts this Friday and Saturday.  Information is on their Facebook LIKE page here. ❤

20190501_193617.jpg

20190501_193606.jpg

 

Secret Chamber

20190220_125733.jpg

I have always been drawn to the exquisite beauty of all that is Ancient Egypt.  I took an Egyptology course at University College while teaching at Bryant & Stratton back in the ’80s to answer a student who questioned why and how Egyptian fashion was selected as the first chapter in the costume history textbook.

20190220_125648.jpg

The answer lies in art, because all of our history to do with ancient cultures comes not from the written word, but from pictures – in this case hieroglyphics, tomb murals and, of course jewelry, as well as the remnants of clothing made of linen fiber.

20190220_125615.jpg

I learned that Napoleon’s French army invaded Egypt in 1798.  They rediscovered the antiquities and were the first archeologists to investigate the area.  It wasn’t the painstaking attention to delicate detail that it is today or even remotely a respectful handling of human remains.

20190220_125604.jpg

20190220_125840.jpg

Many mummies were burned as fuel for steam engines, which is just so tragic.  Later on, in the following century, Egypt became an exotic vacation spot for wealthy Americans who enjoyed purchasing the baubles, scarab beetle decor, and mummies!

20190220_125837.jpg

They held mummy unveiling dinner parties back in the States, stuff like that.

20190220_130435.jpg

20190220_125618.jpg

Howard Carter uncovered King Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922.  This significant find catapulted Egyptian archeology in terms of the level of importance, the regard for history and the sheer magic in attaining this priceless treasure.

20190221_113345.jpg

20190220_125629.jpg

Somewhere in the middle, during the Victorian age, Cazenovia Public Library benefactor Robert James Hubbard and his son accumulated a collection of Ancient Egyptian artifacts including an intricately wrapped-in-linen mummy for the purpose of creating a museum.

20190220_125744.jpg

20190220_125303.jpg

And so, yes, there is a mummy in this library.

20190220_125808.jpg

20190220_125309.jpg

Yesterday, Janine and I visited Cazenovia, New York; first stop, Cazenovia Artisans, second, Common Grounds and next, to the library to see this exhibit.  We ended up at Empire Farm Brewery for lunch.  Janine had never been to any of these spots nor had she an idea this breathtaking collection even existed.  So, my thought is that not many of you know about it.  You’re welcome!

20190220_125737.jpg

20190220_125723.jpg

When I taught elementary art at Bridgeport Elementary School in our district, I decided to add a few lessons on Ancient Egypt culture to the third grade curriculum, because I had this knowledge I wanted to share.  I created a cat mummy sculpture lesson.  Naturally, no pets were harmed.  Students’ sculptures were made of an armature of plastic bottles and styrofoam balls.  They were void of remains, unlike the actual cat mummy at this museum.

20190221_091117.jpg

20190221_091135.jpg

20190220_125713.jpg

At Chittenango, it is the sixth graders who study the ancient civilizations in Social Studies.  They do take a field trip to Cazenovia Library, as the village is adjacent to our school district via Route 13.  I highly recommend a visit.  It is free and really quite extraordinary.

20190220_125832.jpg

20190220_125704.jpg

The library is located at 100 Albany Street, Cazenovia, New York 13035.  It is open Monday – Friday 9:00 am – 9:00 pm, Saturday 10:00 – 5:00 pm.  They are closed on Sundays.  Call (315) 655-9322 for more information.

20190220_125658.jpg

20190220_125755.jpg

The museum space is also home to a gallery for rotating local artist/art organization exhibitions, as well as a wonderful exhibit of birds and plumage in fashion.  They also have many interesting activities for children including puzzle clubs and such.  Yesterday they had a hot chocolate and cookie station available.  Set in a Victorian mansion, this is truly a quaint and lovely experience that really packs a secret chamber punch.  So special!  ❤

20190220_125824.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Au Naturel

20190111_185211

Today in Syracuse, New York, the weather took a nosedive into frigid dead-of-winter temps, but inside the Edgewood Gallery, ( 216 Tecumseh Road, Syracuse, New York, 13224) the landscape is vibrant, warm and creatively cozy.

20190111_185223

20190111_214439

20190111_185540

Proprietor Cheryl Chappell has curated “Nature of Things”, a delightful show of oil paintings, ceramics and jewelry, which will be on exhibit and for sale now through February 22, 2019.  The art reception was tonight with two of the four artists in attendance.

20190111_203241

Rob Glisson‘s landscapes in oils are the stars of this show – several of them sported red sold stickers within the first hour of the opening.  He starts the work as plein-air pieces then takes them into the studio to re-envision them as fantasy worlds contemplating shadows while paying attention to color, volume and depth.  He concentrates on creating worlds that tell a story inviting the viewer to lose themselves within the frames.  I am a huge fan of his work and it is such a pleasure to see so many pieces hanging salon style alongside the lovely cow-dominated oil paintings of fellow artist Adriana Meiss.

20190111_185349

Jan Navales pinch-hit for Dana Stenson tonight, offering visitors information and guidance in selecting for purchase some of the silversmith’s latest creations.

20190111_190520

20190111_185321

20190111_190616

20190111_190741

Karen Jean Smith‘s ceramics have the look of carved wooden objects.  These tromp l’oeil pieces are thrown then hand carved.  She adds the knots and other textures using an intuitive style.  Her work evolved into these thrice-fired amazing creations via an interest in representing nature, specifically water chestnuts, which led her to focus on representing wood.  Some of the pieces are kiln-fired and others are wood-fired.  They are painstakingly glazed using a watercolor technique.  They are really so, so cool.  I just love this series!  She also sold a few pieces at this opening. 🙂

20190111_190856

20190111_190631

20190111_214400

20190111_190640

These artworks are surprisingly affordable.  A lot of them smaller pieces, to add to your art collection or to start one, which is a great New Year’s resolution – I will start my art collection this year!  I will support local artists! Oh, yes.  That has a nice ring to it. Seems like the natural thing to do. ❤

20190111_192126

20190111_192136

20190111_192130