Category Archives: painting

Sensu

20190515_160022.jpg
Karen Tashkovski, “Ichi”, 2019, 8″ x 8″, encaustic & collage, $250
20190515_155815.jpg
Karen Tashkovski, “Fuji”, 2019, 8″ x 8″, encaustic & collage, $250
20190515_160127.jpg
Karen Tashkovski, “Ramen”, 2019, 8″ x 8″, encaustic & collage, $250

I am delighted to announce I have just completed a new series of encaustic & collage paintings!  Yesssssss!  They are fans – sensu in Japanese.  I was inspired by a call-for-Japanese-inspired-art for a group show, which will be curated by Jamie Santos at Kasai Ramen scheduled for next month.

20190515_155909.jpg
Karen Tashkovski, “Shibori”, 2019, 8″ x 8″, encaustic & collage, $250
20190515_160730.jpg
Karen Tashkovski, “Obi”, 2019, 8″ x 8″, encaustic & collage, $250

I love Japanese art!  I’ve introduced my students to it with many different lessons through the years, the most recent of which happened to be utilizing the fan as motif.  This was both inspiration and motivation for me to finally purchase some gesso boards, pull out the beeswax and immerse myself in the full sensation of creation.

20190515_155736.jpg
Karen Tashkovski, “MIA”, 2019, 8″ x 8″, encaustic & collage, $250
20190515_155706.jpg
Karen Tashkovski, “Geisha”, 2019, 8″ x 8″, encaustic & collage, $250

I love how each one of these new pieces is unique – I added elements of origami, kintsugi, and shibari, as well as nods to the specific landscape, sport, and artists (Yayoi Kusama, the Japanese artist who is known for her dot paintings) of the country.

20190515_155757.jpg
Karen Tashkovski, “Sumo”, 2019, 8″ x 8″, encaustic & collage, $250
20190515_155842.jpg
Karen Tashkovski, “Yen”, 2019, 8″ x 8″, encaustic & collage, $250

The very best part of creating art is relaxing into the process – allowing the inspiration to come rather than forcing decision making.  It transports to an other-worldly place where the art becomes the most important thing, where nothing else matters except oneself and the process.  The experience is pure joy; utter bliss. I highly recommend it.  ❤

20190515_160000.jpg
Karen Tashkovski, “Shibari”, 2019, 8″ x 8″, encaustic & collage, $250
20190515_160106.jpg
Karen Tashkovski, “Yayoi”, 2019, 8″ x 8″, encaustic & collage, $250
20190515_155935.jpg
Karen Tashkovski, “Sensu”, 2019, 8″ x 8″, encaustic & collage, $250
Advertisements

New Library Landscapes

20190504_162438.jpg

20190504_162330.jpg

After two hours of hiking around Clark’s Reservation in Jamesville, New York, I was inspired, finally, to stop in to see the new library at 5110 Jamesville Road (DeWitt, New York 13078).  It’s called the Community Library of DeWitt & Jamesville.

24174234_10155338647988155_5963840057385845041_n

20190504_162603.jpg

20190504_162540.jpg

Stephen Alexander Clark is an Assistant Professor of Painting at SUNY Cortland.  His work here depicts abstracted landscapes.  His interest lies in the topography of farmland, the configuration of stacks of firewood and the seeming randomness of camouflage patterns.

20190504_162529.jpg

20190504_162519.jpg

This artwork will be on display through June 2019.  It is located in a hallway that leads to the main library space on the first floor.

20190504_162404.jpg

20190504_162508.jpg

20190504_162458.jpg

20190504_162449.jpg

20190504_162353.jpg

20190504_162418.jpg

A piece by Pam Steele, who will exhibit in September, occupies the space as well. And an installation by Margie Hughto greets visitors at the entrance.  Both pieces belong to the library.

20190504_162318.jpg

Click here for a complete list of future exhibitors.

The library is open Monday – Thursday 10 am – 9 pm, Friday 10 am – 5 pm. Saturday and Sunday hours will change come summer – they are currently Saturday 10 am – 5 pm and Sunday 1 pm – 5 pm.

36199876_10155872864408155_7983509970291261440_n

This little trip inspired me to get to work on a new series of encaustic paintings.  Details to follow, hopefully, soon. ❤

The Elephant in the Room

Elephants are taking over Central New York.

download-1

There is a new restaurant in Skaneateles called the Elephant and the Dove.

56879399_281146196130630_4545782399560056832_n

The brainchild of proprietor Adam Weitsman of the Krebs, this new endeavor serves up Mexican fare.  The name alludes to Mexican artists Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo’s partnership, a marriage of contrasts.  It is meant to be a casual destination – no reservations required.

20190420_112036.jpg

20190420_114207.jpg

images-5

We have seven Asian “pachyderm residents” at the Rosamond Gifford Zoo – Doc, Siri, Romani, Kirina, Targa, Mali and Batu.

images-2

20190420_112347.jpg

20190420_112357.jpg

download-2

20190420_114122.jpg

And, currently, the Petit Branch Library , 105 Victoria Place, Syracuse, New York, is host to original paintings of elephants by Rebecca Stella.  The artist reception is today from 2:00 – 4:00 pm. The exhibition continues through April 30, 2019.

20190420_112108.jpg

Here is the press release –

Artist Rebecca Alexander (Rebecca Stella Art) will be exhibiting her work throughout the month of April. Her work is primarily mixed media, many pieces of which are elephant and music themed. She donates 10% of all elephant art sales to the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust in Kenya, an organization that provides support to end the ivory trade and promote elephant conservation via an orphan rescue and rehabilitation program. Rebecca believes that art and painting are channels for emotion, dreams, and fantasy. In addition to being an artist and animal activist, Rebecca is a yoga instructor and a physical therapist. She shares, “All of these roles shape my creations and the way in which I choose to interact with the world. 

20190420_112115.jpg

Rebecca sells her work on Etsy . You can also find her on Facebook.

20190420_112418.jpg

32584760_1691932190855034_2571485916132540416_n

Oh, and lest I forget, my favorite of all elephant sites – Bistro Elephant, which is what they call the bar area/bistro of the Lemon Grass restaurant in Armory Square.  It offers the best Thai cuisine.  My favorite place to go on a Friday night to hear my friend John Spillet on sax. ❤

Cancel That

Currently, three venues are hosts to the twenty-four Syracuse University MFA candidates: Point of Contact Gallery, Community Folk Art Center and the SU Art Galleries. The art reception at POC was last Friday (that show continues through May 10, 2019), the one at CFA will be Thursday, April 18, 2019 from 5:30 – 7:30 pm (show continues through May 11, 2019). Last night at the Shaffer Hall venue, I attended the art reception for eleven of these students.

20190411_185049.jpg

What I love about Thursday evening art openings on campus – you can drive right up to the gate and park for free in the Q-4 lot – easy-peasy! It was such a beautiful evening. The university is a reoccurring landscape in my life. I really love being there. I received my BFA and MS degrees from Syracuse. I did not get an MFA, which I guess I would need if I am ever to be considered for a job as an Art Professor at SU (the Art Education masters is a Masters of Science for whatever reason, which is weird). A series of questions answered in essay format served as my thesis and not a gallery showcase of artwork, as is the case in these recent exhibitions.

20190411_183834.jpg

20190411_185215.jpg

20190411_185103.jpg

The students have varied focuses – illustration, painting and digital art, for example. Apparently, the cohesive thread of this work, according to the curator’s statement, is to do with the artist’s responses to their current realities and the angst that resides there be it via monstrous nightmare, political climate, gender issues, or social injustices, or some combination of junk that creates a response to conditions. The artists in this particular show seem to be attempting to express views, beliefs, fears and perceived truths in a sort of thinking man’s artist thing-a-ma-gig.

20190411_185005.jpg

Nothing tickled me here – true story – and that could just be because I am so not their generation, (kids these days, am I right? lol) and because I am a happiness-and-joy girl. I am perplexed by the need to be conditional about anything. I trust that everything unfolds when you are true to yourself, creating a vision that exposes yourself in a vulnerable way, perhaps, allowing your inner being to guide you towards the inspiration that will captivate. You feel it in your soul and that beauty that is within becomes your art and it subsequently resonates with the world. You will know it, your friends will know it, your professors will know it and you will see how incredibly it will take you where you want to go, easily and effortlessly.

So where do these kids see themselves? A conversation with some professors indicated that student art direction these days is focused on thinking about rather than the executing of ideas. This is not something I really understand. Are they not happy?

Are they hoping to open a dialogue about negative stuff? I don’t know. Some of this work is on the rather provocative side in the way that I cannot bring my thirteen-year-old students to this gallery on a field trip. There is some adult content of a sexual nature, as well as pieces that draw attention to violence and horror.

20190411_185408.jpg

Let’s cancel all that.

I guess I don’t agree with the blurb sentiment “sober examination of the facts”. We create our own realities based on dreams and desires. Choosing to get caught up in something you don’t want or don’t like just does not make sense to me. If I create a reality I don’t want, I don’t choose to stay there and dwell in it, complain about it and get stuck there. And I don’t really think it is the blanket statement under which all of these artists sleep, is it? Or is Plans are Cancelled a reference to a positive re-boot?

20190411_185347.jpg

20190411_192128.jpg

The fun for me are these questions, not in the answers because the questions alone allowed me to ponder solutions of my own with regard to my own life. I am grateful for this show because I had really satisfying conversations with my friends Penny and Davana about this show and about how it can help us define/re-define ourselves as artists and teachers.

And it was also so helpful to share what I saw here with my Studio in Art students. It is so important to me as a teacher that I offer guidance in the form of training my students to trust and believe in themselves, to know that they will be able to navigate their path to whatever they care to do artistically in the future with or without me.

I wish these MFA candidates the best of luck and love in their creative journeys. I sincerely thank you all for your perspectives. ❤

Plans are Cancelled will remain on display until May 12, 2019.

20190411_183830.jpg

20190411_184526.jpg

20190411_184604.jpg

20190411_184556.jpg

20190411_184708.jpg

20190411_184703-1.jpg

20190411_184639.jpg

20190411_184634.jpg

20190411_184620.jpg

***Artists represented at Syracuse University Art Galleries

Hollie Lyko, E. Garrett Bryant, Perry Burlingame, Jestina Sutherland, Rebecca Forstater, Sylvie Prendergast-Corvo, Samantha Corbett, Louise Thompson, Jason Cheney, Mark Zbikowski, Jiallin Deng

I See Deb Walsh

20190411_181112.jpg

20190411_181125.jpg

20190411_181150.jpg

20190411_181139.jpg

“Eye Studio Arts, LLC is featuring the work of artist Deborah Walsh during the month of April. Walsh is known for her acrylic paintings of reflections on shiny surfaces, most often cars, motorcycles, chrome, and glass. Her work is about how light and color is diffused and reflected on various surfaces creating repetition, variation, pattern and rhythm.
Walsh graduated with a BFA in Painting and MS in Art Education from SU. As a retired Liverpool art teacher, she says her students she taught inspired her for more than 30 years. Her work has been included in Central New York Regional and National juried shows as well as many one-woman and group exhibitions. Private collectors throughout the United States own and commission work.
The Artist Reception, April 12th, will feature an acoustic performance by Caleb Liber, food and beverages and an opportunity to meet the artist.” (from the art exhibition Facebook page)

20190411_181100.jpg

20190411_181054.jpg

I stopped into Eye Studio this evening – once again I missed the art reception by about twenty-four hours and ten minutes.  But, yes, I was there.  The art studio is a place for ceramics, glassware, and drawing and painting classes for all ages and ability levels.  There is a gift shoppe in the front room and two adjacent gallery spaces with the classrooms in the roomy back space.

My encaustic angel show was up at this time last year.  It is a wonderful gallery space and Walsh’s work is spectacular.  This art is highly collectible!  I can see how the car motif resonates with so many people – from color to model and make.  It is the kind of thing tailor-made for home décor.  Walsh’s prices are quite reasonable for her originals and there are also Giclée prints available that are of incredible quality.

20190411_181201.jpg

Deb Walsh has been painting shiny, reflective-surfaced items for almost thirty years.  She gravitates to vehicles, but is currently also finding that this style works well with silver tea-sets and glassware.

Here is her artist statement from the Saatchi art website:

About Deborah Walsh

20190411_181021.jpg

The work will be on display until April 30, 2019.

20190411_181029.jpg

20190411_181210.jpg

20190411_181016.jpg

See the website for more information including hours of operation and pricing (here).

 

Sweet Alley

20190330_212558.jpg

20190330_214302.jpg

20190330_213029.jpg

Tony Thompson’s closing reception was last night.  He’d been showing his artwork at Kasai Ramen, 218 Walton Street, Syracuse, New York 13203 for two months.  I decided to go and it was the first time I’d been to this location in twenty-six years!  OMG.  It used to be Sweet Baba’s, the very first place I exhibited my own art.  I was the house artist for a while – I don’t remember how long, but it was the place where I sold my first painting, which led to a commission.  Fond memories.

20190330_214518.jpg

20190330_214343.jpg

20190330_214454.jpg

The restaurant itself is a work of art.  It was built in the alley between two buildings.  The Walton Street entrance boasts a cozy bar area and some seating.  There are three staircases, one a spiral, that lead to a lower level filled with the ambiance of brick walls, dark lighting and the dance of kitchen staff preparing asian fusion meals to perfection.

20190330_214350.jpg

20190330_214547.jpg

“Kasai Ramen is a 100 seat, two level restaurant. Its menu features traditional Ramen and Izakaya dishes with a Salt City attitude. Featuring superior service and exceptional quality food in an electric fast paced atmosphere Kasai is the restaurant to dine at in Armory Square. Come enjoy an order of Pork Gyoza, Shrimp Steam Buns, Shoyu Ramen and a Whole Roasted Duck!”

20190330_215435.jpg

20190330_213053.jpg

20190330_214243.jpg

Thompson is a Syracuse bred artist currently living in Utica, New York.  He exhibits regionally and is part of the graffiti/tattoo stable of artists led by my friend Jamie Santos.  These thirty somethings have commandeered the art scene here with many cool-themed pop-up shows and curated group restaurant gigs under their young hipster belts.

20190330_214535.jpg

20190330_214359.jpg

20190330_214404.jpg

20190330_214419.jpg

The work here is cohesive.  Thompson uses found object canvases – discarded windows, old cabinets and wood scraps.  His work is a narrative of the inner workings of his mind.  Portraits that bring to mind a Basquiat quality with competent, confident line quality that belies his mostly self-taught status.  The other imagery appears like a nightmare jutxaposed with sweet child-like innocence.  My favorite pieces are the glass ones.  They are a fun marriage of old and new, the window allowing the viewer to, sort of, see into the artist’s engagingly energetic mind.

20190330_214529.jpg

20190330_214525.jpg

20190330_213040.jpg

Next up for the restaurant is a show by Jamie and beyond that, a curated Japanese-themed one that I may be a part of.  I am immersed in Japanese art and culture right now with four of my classes using Hokusai and other wood block print references, so it may be up my alley. (Get it?  Because Kasai Ramen is built in an alley….)

20190330_214502.jpg

20190330_214410.jpg

Find Tony Thompson on Facebook.

20190330_215424.jpg

20190330_215513.jpg

Best Intentions

20190220_121612.jpg

20190220_122957.jpg

Janine and I took a trip to Cazenovia, New York today.  We visited Cazenovia Artisans, an artist’s co-op.  It is located at 39 Albany Street in the heart of the village.  Linda Bigness just joined, so I thought it would be fun to visit and see the new work. (For a full list of artists in the cooperative, visit their website).

20190220_121633.jpg

Bob Ripley was manning the register.  He is a former Advertising Design man turned full time watercolorist.  His work is AMAZING!

20190220_121621.jpg

20190220_121617.jpg

20190220_121607.jpg

It was such an honor to meet him and speak with him about his art.  Bob uses Windsor & Newton watercolors and Arches 300 pound paper, which he staples into foam board while working on the individual pieces.

20190220_122054.jpg

20190220_120548.jpg

Bob shared his technique – here he is working on a commission.  He added the figure of the man into the landscape and strategically placed the fishing line to add rhythm to the composition.

20190220_120622.jpg

He uses frisket to assist in the layering process of glazing.  It stops the paint from bleeding into areas and also helps to save the white of the paper, which is a watercolor technique used instead of painting with the more opaque Chinese white paint.  In addition, he shared a method he’d perfected through trial and error – placing clear transparent tape on an area then going back in and shaving the edge with an Exacto blade to match it with the landscape, all to insure that the paint stays where it belongs.

20190220_121600.jpg

20190220_121555.jpg

Watercolor is tricky that way.  It is about sheer layers blending together.  Bob was very clear about never using black.  Instead, he combines Hooker’s Green and Alizarin Crimson or if he wants a cooler looking dark, he mixes the Alizarin with Ultramarine Blue.

20190220_121551.jpg

This work is really incredible.  Each piece takes about seventy or eighty hours to complete.  Bob draws the basic lines of the landscape then adds more detail with pencil as needed.

20190220_121547.jpg

20190220_121511.jpg

20190220_121532.jpg

There are original watercolor paintings on the wall for sale, as well as high quality Giclee prints, which look almost identical to the originals in quality and color.  Each piece is infused with Bob Ripley’s vivacious spirit.  He is so talented!

20190220_121527.jpg

20190220_121524.jpg

20190220_122544.jpg

20190220_122522.jpg

Thank you, Bob Ripley!!!  And thank you, Janine Hudun, for joining me.  We also popped over to the Cazenovia Public Library to visit their museum and gallery (blog to follow) then had lunch at Empire Farm Brewery.

I privately set an intention this morning – I wanted to see a cardinal, believe it or not.  People always say that when a cardinal crosses your path, it is a sign that someone who has passed away is nearby.  I was sifting through Bob’s prints thinking I might see one (I can’t explain why I thought he would even have one). Then I turned and found a cardinal print in his section on the greeting card fixture!

Later that day, I saw an actual cardinal while hiking around Green Lakes.  It literally called out to me then it frantically fluttered about while I flustered getting my cell phone from my pocket.  I was laughing and crying at the same time while trying to get the shot, so this is not a great picture, lol, but it doesn’t matter.  Thanks, Dad. ❤

20190220_171601.jpg

Cazenovia Artisans is open Monday – Saturday 10:00 am – 5:00 pm and Sunday 10:00 am – 4:00 pm.  For more information call (315) 655-2225.