Category Archives: art museum

City Market

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

20190811_123004.jpg

20190811_123032.jpg

When I met Jason Alexander, I did that goofy Cinderella’s step-sister thing and asked him how he liked our Syracuse, New York weather.

He replied, “It sucks!”  This was after a performance of the play he’d directed at Syracuse Stage.  My friend and I looked at each other in an are-you-kidding-me glance because we both love it here, both love to hike whether in rain, snow, sleet or hail.  And our weather had been particularly great in June.

So funny – and that is why I don’t have a selfie with the Seinfeld alum.

20190811_123112.jpg

20190811_123153.jpg

Today’s weather is sheer perfection – a magnificent sunny and breezy day to explore the offerings at City Market.  Sponsored by the Everson Museum of Art (401 Harrison Street, Syracuse, NY 13202), the market is housed on the museum grounds around the fountains.

20190811_123208.jpg

20190811_123226.jpg

It takes place on the second Sunday of the month from 10 am – 4 pm.  There are two dates left before the season ends – Sunday, September 8, 2019 and Sunday, October 13, 2019.

20190811_123257.jpg

20190811_123341.jpg

There is a lot to peruse – jewelry, trinkets, clothing, food, furniture and flea market-y miscellaneousness.  And art, of course.

20190811_123358.jpg

20190811_123422.jpg

20190811_123622.jpg

Ken Nichols is there selling the mugs and rice bowls created in his studio at Clayscapes Pottery.

20190811_124243.jpg

Tyler Cagwin created Nostalgia Chocolate.  He manufactures the product here in Syracuse with international cocoa beans.  The flavors are rich and satisfying!  Gourmet chocolate with health benefits! (That’s a win-win).

20190811_124508.jpg

20190811_124519.jpg

20190811_124549.jpg

20190811_124623.jpg

20190811_124641.jpg

20190811_125129.jpg

20190811_125342.jpg

20190811_125208.jpg

I loved these ceramic pins and magnets created by Beckie Bortel of Beckie’s Pottery.  They have a substantial feel to them and they look like ginger snap cookies.  Great patina!

20190811_125349.jpg

20190811_125408.jpg

Terry Lynn Cameron is selling originals and prints of her colorful paintings. The prints are done on canvas, which is very cool.  I am really impressed with how she markets her product!  Some of the art has been adhered to sketchbooks and daily planners.  Love!

20190811_130617.jpg

20190811_131004.jpg

20190811_130226.jpg

20190811_131425.jpg

Lori Lizzio‘s work can be found as originals, prints and notecards.  They are ink and wash pieces of animals and figures.

20190811_131337.jpg

Syracuse does have beautiful weather, Jason Alexander, and beautiful people – and art.  It is satisfying and fun.  Really fun.  It doesn’t suck. ❤

20190811_122948.jpg

 

Advertisements

Clark’s

20190810_143446.jpg

20190810_143816.jpg

I can barely walk right now – I hike literally everyday – at least seven miles per, but today the stairs at Clark’s Reservation kicked my butt.  They are depicted here in this scale model, located inside the Nature Center at the park.

23559881_1964708196889480_1177250497781173668_n

They were built in 1878 by James McFarlane who had purchased the property to turn it into a summer resort.  Patrons could take the stairs to catch a boat ride on the meromictic lake.  Descending them now is like living in a dream.  They are of the rustic old-timey variety – and there are a lot of them.

17626213_1705413949485574_280561975567647286_n

And when you get to the bottom you see this sign, reminiscent of a Scooby Doo cartoon, that reads Danger Quicksand.  Is quicksand really real?  Really??!!

20190810_144922.jpg

20190810_143600.jpg

20190810_143611.jpg

Clark’s history is a fascinating one.  The land had first been divided to be allotted to Revolutionary War veterans in the 1700s.  For some unknown reason, nobody collected it and so, it was reassessed, sold and sold again until Mary Clark Thompson purchased the lot of it and donated it to the state of New York in tribute to her father.  It is a New York State park, one that is free to the public and open dawn to dusk every day.

20190810_143620.jpg

20190810_143628.jpg

It is located at 6105 E. Seneca Turnpike, Jamesville, New York 13078. ((315) 492-1908)

20190810_143633.jpg

20190810_143647-1.jpg

There is a Nature Center there.  Cameron Aloi is the resident naturalist.  He is a student at SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry.  He will be there to answer your questions (as he was today) on the weekends from 11 am – 4 pm.  Other volunteers, part of the network known as the Council of Park Friends (CPF), take turns manning the museum during the week.

20190810_143640.jpg

20190810_143651-1.jpg

They are responsible for the nature center’s maintenance and also offer many programs to educate the public in regards to the flora and fauna of the park.  CPF welcomes new members with a tax deductible gift as low as $20 per year.

20190810_143704.jpg

20190810_143708.jpg

Upcoming events include a photography hike on August 17, 2019 at 1 pm and the annual volunteer meeting on September 12, 2019.  See their web-site for the deets.

20190810_143725.jpg

20190810_143729.jpg

20190810_143742.jpg

My favorite part of my visit was seeing the great collection of taxidermy wildlife.  They would be ideal for my classroom.  OMG, the drawings we could do!  Pheasants and bobcats are on my dream classroom wishlist (true story, that). ❤

20190810_143753.jpg

20190810_143735.jpg

20190418_174311.jpg

Cruz-ing

20190725_180242-1.jpg

20190725_180513.jpg

The retrospective currently on exhibition in two of the upstairs galleries at the Everson Museum of Art (401 Harrison Street, Syracuse, New York 13202) was fifty years in the making.  Puerto Rican born Juan Cruz has spent the past forty years dwelling here in Syracuse, New York, making murals, teaching and working on a collegiate degree in Fine Art from Syracuse University.  And painting – he has been creating the mother-lode of paintings.

20190725_181028.jpg

20190725_180529.jpg

20190725_180301-1.jpg

This show exemplifies what I have always wanted the Everson to be – a museum that believes in local artists, supporting their careers and offering ample space to breathe love and life into a body of work that illustrates the strength, character and beauty of an artist’s life-long vision.

20190725_180525-1.jpg

20190725_180605.jpg

20190725_180911.jpg

There are paintings that show Cruz’s proficiency with realism – watercolor landscapes and oil on paper portraits.  These pieces are the yellow bricks of the journey.  They offer the first dance on a path that takes a left hand cruise into abstraction.

20190725_180348.jpg

20190725_181024.jpg

20190725_180503.jpg

20190725_180312.jpg

Those abstracts even go 3-D via a few sculptures as well, but the artist’s main strength is in the confident energy of the gnarled face forms peering out of these canvases, evidently pleading to be understood.

20190725_181017.jpg

20190725_181014.jpg

This energy alludes to social injustices felt both personally and as a member of a Caribbean culture with economic drama.  There is abundant repetition of shape and color interspersed with black outlines, as well as bright white.  This co-mingling rhythm creates a cartoon-like flavor undermining the angst, which gets more pronounced in the newer pieces, suggesting a shift to a more positive perspective for this working artist.

I would imagine pure full-on non-representational abstraction is the goal, obliterating the need to be understood by the masses, because when the goal is freedom of expression, the limitation of pleasing others gives way to one’s own knowing.  Knowing the rightness of choices made with deliberate intent.

20190725_180635.jpg

20190725_180621.jpg

It’s all about the journey, and this one is an enormously satisfying one.  I am delighted that I was able to witness this body of work as it is displayed.   And for Juan Cruz, the best is yet to come.  Because the dance is by no means over – it has just begun. ❤

20190725_180845.jpg

Juan Cruz:  A Retrospective concludes on August 4, 2019.  (Up next – Yoko Ono!)

20190725_180726-1.jpg

20190725_180715.jpg

20190725_180843.jpg

20190725_180658.jpg

20190725_180753-1.jpg

****From the Everson website

Syracuse-based artist Juan Alberto Cruz (b. 1941, Puerto Rico) combines rich symbolism with a bold and colorful abstract style to create work infused with his Caribbean heritage. Moving from Puerto Rico to Manhattan’s Lower East Side and subsequent travels to Spain, Mexico, Cuba, and Central America have had a major impact on Cruz’s work, which reflects a mixture of his cultural heritage and life experiences. From his earliest portrait paintings to recent abstract collages, Cruz uses the emotional realities of his past to articulate his feelings about economic inequality and systematic injustice.

As a child, Cruz taught himself to draw by copying the comic strips from discarded newspapers onto brown paper grocery bags, and later he drew portraits of everyday people that he sold for pocket change on the street. It was not until his thirties, when he enrolled in an art program led by then-Everson Director Jim Harithas that Cruz learned art could be more than replicating the world around him. Harithas taught Cruz how to paint and introduced him to a world of modern artists, which led Cruz’s drawings and paintings to evolve into a complex amalgamation of figurative and abstract forms. For the past five decades, Cruz’s boundless creativity and production has led him to compile a massive body of work. 

Since moving to Syracuse in 1975, Cruz has made a significant impact on the local community. He has painted numerous murals throughout the city, including on the Onondaga Commons building, in Skiddy Park, and several in the Near West Side. He also completed a new mural with the Everson Teen Arts Council currently on view on the Museum’s Lower Level. Cruz served as artist-in-residence for the Near West Side Initiative for five years and ran the Patch-Up Studio, a community center that provided children and adults with a safe space to make and learn about art. By choosing to live and work in Syracuse, Cruz has brought together a multigenerational community inspired by his public art initiatives and workshops.

20190725_180654.jpg

20190725_180806.jpg

20190725_180647.jpg

20190725_180638.jpg

20190725_180822.jpg

20190725_180533.jpg

20190725_180458.jpg

20190725_180441.jpg

20190725_180418.jpg

EVERSON MUSEUM OF ART HOURS:

SUNDAY 12-5
MONDAY CLOSED
TUESDAY CLOSED
WEDNESDAY 12-5
THURSDAY 12-8
FRIDAY 12-5
FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH NOON–8:00PM
SATURDAY 10-5

Call (315) 474-6064 for more information.

20190725_180335.jpg

20190725_180834.jpg

Garden of Eddie

20190725_182617.jpg

20190725_182611.jpg

20190725_182553.jpg

Eddie Dominguez transports us to his version of the Garden of Eden in his show at the Everson Museum of Art‘s Robineau Memorial Gallery.

20190725_182549.jpg

His vision is one that reflects a heritage in which landscape and religion play vital roles.  He is from New Mexico, although his art education took him to Ohio and New York, which is why we are able to fall under his spell here in Syracuse, New York.  This show was curated by the Columbus Museum of Art and will be on exhibit until Sunday, July 28, 2019.

20190725_175953.jpg

20190725_180112.jpg

Dominguez combines ceramics and found objects to create his irreverent world.  It is a playful, fantastical and thoroughly original body of work. ❤

20190725_180022.jpg

20190725_180013.jpg

20190725_180010.jpg

*** from the Everson Museum of Art website

The youngest of eight children, Eddie Dominguez grew up in Tucumcari, New Mexico, between Albuquerque and Amarillo on historic Route 66. He came to national prominence in the mid–1980s for highly stylized dinnerware sets that also stack into sculptural forms. In his work, Dominguez frequently references his home state’s vegetation, landforms, weather, and Hispano–Catholic culture. The dual nature of Dominguez’s objects, which inhabit the gray area between utility and art for art’s sake, reflects his personal experience as a New Mexican who studied ceramics in the Anglo–dominated East: whether we see “art” or “craft,” local Hispano or melting pot American depends completely on the immediate context.

20190725_175959.jpg

20190725_175940.jpg

The Everson Museum of Art is located at 401 Harrison Street, Syracuse, New York, 13202.  Call (315) 474-6064 for more information.

EVERSON MUSEUM OF ART HOURS:

SUNDAY 12-5
MONDAY CLOSED
TUESDAY CLOSED
WEDNESDAY 12-5
THURSDAY 12-8
FRIDAY 12-5
FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH NOON–8:00PM
SATURDAY 10-5

20190725_175930.jpg

20190725_175915.jpg