Category Archives: drawing

Measuring Up

20190901_151714.jpg

20190901_155135.jpg

20190901_151910.jpg

The Art Galleries at Syracuse University are designed to facilitate education.  In other words, it’s a teaching museum.  Professors require students to go to there – to critique the art/learn how to judge a work of art.  Students journal about experiences for classes, attend the receptions and lectures, and even work there (which has to be the greatest work-study gig).

Last year, former Director Domenic Iocono mentioned it was the reason artists like Jasper Johns, James Rosenquist and Kiki Smith wanted to collaborate by sharing their work with our community, enhancing the walls of the spaces with their respective visions.

20190901_151821.jpg

In this season’s first exhibition, Not a Metric Matters, the university galleries led by new Director and Chief Curator Vanja Malloy, Ph.D. hosts its own – the School of Visual & Performing Arts faculty.  It is an opportunity to showcase their talent, yes, and also turn the tables on the critiquing process allowing the professors to show students how it’s really done.

Margie Hughto has been affiliated with the university for many, many years.  When I spoke to her last month, she said teaching is still fun and so, she will continue to share her expertise with students for many years to come.

Her ceramic and found object work is exquisite.  It is perfection in editing – selecting just the right found object pieces to coordinate with the ceramic pieces.  The work alludes to the recent discarded and forgotten in terms of technology.

20190901_151835.jpg

The thought provoking concepts aside, Hughto’s artwork screams of her strength of character.  She finds beauty in every angle, in each piece fused as one.  They are signatures of her style while continuing to surprise and delight us, continuing a growth trajectory as an artist and that in itself is the lesson.

20190901_151851.jpg

20190901_151844.jpg

20190901_152730-1.jpg

20190901_152756.jpg

20190901_152744.jpg

Holly Greenberg has isolated grief in this productive series of drawings.  These pieces resonated with me – as you know my father recently passed away and his belongings are still in the closets, his car in the driveway at Mom’s house.  Using these ordinary objects as memento gives them a lovingly somber power and isolating them in their compositions drives the message home.

It is curious how objects can retain the emotion of the spirit and Greenberg’s proficiency in rendering provides the elevation of their status.

20190901_152823.jpg

20190901_152500.jpg

20190901_152352.jpg

Ann Clarke‘s fiber artwork is marvelously original.  Texture is my thing and seeing monumental work on the walls creates a bold statement about time.  The fabrics are traditional, but the techniques are fresh and alive.  The hooked rug eye is really incredible in-person.  I love the idea of taking a method we all used in the past and formulating this new pattern, which seems to denote to me that someone is watching over me, loving me.

20190901_152430.jpg

Clarke’s statement does imply that she is the watchful eye for her ailing mother and that is a beautiful thing.  That the old becomes new again, and time is cyclical.

20190901_152420.jpg

20190901_152639.jpg

20190901_152333.jpg

20190901_152536-1.jpg

Other teaching artists in this show –

Yasser Aggour, Cooper Battersby, Emily Vey Duke, Don Carr, Deborah Dohne, Heath Hanlin, Seyeon Lee, Sarah McCoubrey, Su Hyun Nam, Vasilios Papajoannu, James Ransome, Tom Sherman and Chris Wildrick

Their work takes dimension as paintings, drawings, photo-collage, video and installation – and all have something important to say within the context of their visualizations.

20190901_152549.jpg

20190901_153638-1.jpg

20190901_153632.jpg

20190901_152639.jpg

20190901_152707.jpg

20190901_153638-1.jpg

20190901_153632.jpg

There are more exhibits in the space, all curated by different people.  DJ Hellerman is the curator of this show.  He is the Art and Program Curator at the Everson Museum of Art and collaborates with SU’s Department of Transmedia.  I met him while stumbling into a critique of university students’ final exhibitions at Apostrophe’s.

20190901_153827.jpg

David Prince curated the display of former VPA faculty members.  As you know, I am an SU grad (B.F.A. ’85, M.S. ’93).  These professors are my people.  I absolutely loved Rodger Mack.  He was so devoted to building the sculpture department and his bronze sculptures are THE BEST!

20190901_153653.jpg

Seeing his hands portrayed by Jerome Witkin brought a tear to my eye.  There is so much love here, people.  Going to Syracuse University was a dream come true for me – I feel incredibly blessed to have been the first person in my family to ever go to a university –  and to see the professors being honored is such a gift.  They deserve every accolade.

20190901_153820.jpg

They were and are true working artists, not just people showing up to collect a paycheck.

20190901_153737.jpg

There’s lots more to see of these exhibits and the vast permanent collections.  It will all be on display until November 24, 2019.  There will be an art reception on Thursday, September 12, 2019 from 5 – 7 pm.  And Holly Greenberg will be giving a presentation in the adjacent Shemin Auditorium on Thursday, November 7, 2019 at 6:30 pm.

Syracuse University Art Galleries is located in the Shaffer Art Building on Syracuse University campus.  Free parking is available on Sundays and on Thursday evenings in the Q lot – or at least it was when I was there yesterday.  Call (315) 443-4097 for more information including hours of operation.  ❤

20190901_153721.jpg

20190901_153756.jpg

Advertisements

Circles of Life

20190802_175551.jpg

20190802_174626.jpg

20190802_174826.jpg

I didn’t know Marlene Roeder could draw when I met her twenty-five years ago while we were both working at Franklin Magnet School, an arts magnet elementary in the Syracuse City school district in Syracuse, New York.

She was the grant writer and big into theatrical productions.  I was a daily substitute teacher.  She has since retired from that job, as well as from her position as an education curator at the Everson Museum of Art – and taken up the art of mandala making.

20190802_180116.jpg

Her artwork is available for sale at Eye Studio (712 W. Manlius Street, East Syracuse, New York).  Last night was the opening reception for Circle of Life, a month-long exhibition of these intricate ink and colored pencil originals and prints.

20190803_131037.jpg

Marlene shared her passion for creating the drawings.  She begins with a large compass then decides how many points she will create.  Pencil then pen and ink followed by color.  Some of the pieces have been published in a coloring book.  She does “coloring parties” too, in which she offers color theory tips and the therapeutic escape that coloring provides.

20190802_174520.jpg

There are several series within this concept.  Groupings of pieces inspired by family, landscapes, seascapes, still-lifes, time and social injustice.  They are all infused with a spiritual belief system and a desire to share visual thinking strategies as a means to understand and further enjoy art, and the art-making process.

20190803_131237.jpg

20190802_174540.jpg

20190802_175547.jpg

Marlene is an advocate for “the persecuted and oppressed”.  She gives 20% of her art sales to the A21 Campaign, an international organization that fights to end human trafficking.

20190803_131142.jpg

For more information, contact the artist at mroeder01@gmail.com. ❤

20190802_174558.jpg

20190802_174603.jpg

20190802_174633.jpg

371dd15fa92f63b9aa365cab339eae70

Gallery and Gift Shop Hours

Monday – Tuesday   11am – 7pm.       Thursday                12pm – 7pm

​Wednesday             3pm – 7 pm         Friday – Saturday    12pm – 5pm

20190802_174646.jpg

20190802_174529.jpg

20190802_174633.jpg

20190802_175516.jpg

Art-5 & Fun

20190523_125833.jpg

It takes my entire lunch period to prep for the class of twenty-three 5th graders – they are here every “A” day during 8th period.  This was yesterday.  Their clay slab/hand-built fish were ready to go home.  I placed an empty Wegman’s bag, along with their sculptures, grade sheets and the packets for the invention project at their seats.  It is organized mayhem, lol.

20190523_125851.jpg

20190523_125909.jpg

I say that in case you think the room is messy, because it is not really mayhem at all.  They are a wonderful group of eleven-year-olds – smart, talented, happy people-pleasers.  I love spending time with them.  I give them a different assigned seat every class, so that they sit with different people each time.  They have to hunt for their seat.  It’s actually kind of fun.

I love how busy they all are in these pictures.  Everyone is completely on task.  The two students looking at the I-pad are checking the spelling of a word (above).  Only three students did not finish their invention drawings, which I will eventually combine to be sent to the high school print department to be made into a coloring book – hopefully by the end of next class.

20190523_125917.jpg

20190523_130008.jpg

They recently finished a landscape illustration using Grant Wood and Grandma Moses as references, and a wood sculpture using Louise Nevelson and Yayoi Kusama as references, as well as the clay fish and the Leonardo daVinci-esque invention.   

20190523_130017.jpg

Next up is a mixed-media lesson referencing Faith Ringgold.  We will add a quilted border to a dreamy drawing.

cropped-cropped-faith-ringgold-and-me-001.jpg

20190523_130118.jpg

Students meet every other day for one semester, which is different than elementary school where students meet once every six day rotation for the entire school year.

Fifth graders started attending Chittenango Middle School (instead of the elementary schools) four years ago. I teach the seventh section of 5th grade (Mrs. Samsel’s class) while my colleague, Joyce Backus, teaches the other six sections (in her own classroom), in addition to teaching all of the Bridgeport Elementary School students.

So fun! ❤

20190523_130220.jpg

20190523_130247.jpg

 

 

Coloring OZ

2019 Coloring Contest (FINAL) 1

2019 Coloring Contest (FINAL) 2

Once again, my 8th grade Studio in Art students created illustrations for the Oz-stravaganza coloring contest!  Eight drawings were selected for 2019.  They are available on-line and at various stores on Route 5 in the village of Chittenango, New York.

2019 Coloring Contest (FINAL) 3

2019 Coloring Contest (FINAL) 4

Students used Sharpie marker to outline their pencil drawings.  This was one of the six sketchbook homework projects I assigned last quarter.  I have eighteen students in my class – eight of the drawings were printed to be used in the contest.  Organizer Judy Waite told me it was very difficult to narrow it down to just eight.  They were all wonderful!  Coloring contest drawings from previous years have been bound into a coloring book for sale at the event.  Win-win!

20190211_113427
Top (from left) – Lilly K., Riley S., Isabella L., Kristina T. Bottom (from left) – Amelia D., Lindsey T., Edward M., and Shannon G.

2019 Coloring Contest (FINAL) 5

It is truly an honor for all of us to participate in this community event.  Several of these artists won the coloring contest when they were elementary students!  My 5th graders are coloring the illustrations now.  Entries were sent to all eligible students at Chittenango Middle School and the two elementary schools in the district.  Entries are due on May 8th, 2019.  They will be judged by members of the Oz-stravaganza committee and winners will be awarded at a ceremony on Sunday, June 2nd, 2019 at 11:00 am in Oak Park in the village.

2019 Coloring Contest (FINAL) 6

Chittenango, New York is the birthplace of L. Frank Baum, the author of the Wizard of Oz.  Each year there is a festival to honor him.  This year’s theme is “The Magic of Oz”.  There will be all sorts of events including a parade.  For more information go to the committee’s web page – here. ❤

2019 Coloring Contest (FINAL) 7

2019 Coloring Contest (FINAL) 8

Doodle for Google 2019

20190214_130549.jpg

20190214_130604.jpg

20190301_141420.jpg

I just mailed these Chittenango Middle School entries to the Doodle for Google 2019 contest.  This year’s theme is “When I Grow Up, I Hope….”

20190214_130517.jpg

20190214_130618.jpg

These are some of my Art-8 and 8th grade accelerated Studio in Art student entries.  My 5th graders also took part in the contest.  The deadline is March 16th so there is still time to mail in the stragglers’ art after winter break, thank goodness.

20190214_130635.jpg

20190214_130713.jpg

Among the recurring themes – ending world hunger, space exploration, and fun with animals.  Other ideas included fashion, graduating from high school/college and cheating death.

20190214_130700.jpg

20190214_130650.jpg

One of my favorites was this one above – solving mysteries with the Scooby Doo gang.  Who doesn’t dream about this from time-to-time?  Really, I know you do!

20190214_130722.jpg

20190214_130535.jpg

20190214_130732.jpg

The prize is $30,000 for the individual student, $50,000 in technology for their school and their google doodle will be on a T-shirt.  It will also grace the web-site for twenty-four hours (and proclaim the winner the title of Chief Doodler for the day).  So cool.

20190214_130742.jpg

20190214_130752.jpg

What a huge and most amazing thing it would be if one of my students wins the whole shebang?!  It will be the greatest thing that would and could ever happen in my career, lol, except…this was the assignment I gave as lesson plans for the substitute when I was absent on family leave the week of my father’s passing.  So, technically, I guess … no – oh, come on now, this is crazy talk…I will still take pride in a win.  Making art that helps a student visualize their dreams? – now that is a win-win! ❤

20190214_130816.jpg

20190214_130826.jpg

20190214_130802.jpg

20190215_102601.jpg

20190215_102610.jpg

20190215_102532.jpg

20190215_102542.jpg

20190215_102552.jpg

20190215_102622.jpg