Category Archives: sculpture

The Thaw Legacy

20190713_170518.jpg

20190713_165243.jpg

Eugene and Clare Thaw began collecting Native American art in 1987 when they lived in Santa Fe, New Mexico.  They donated the collection to the Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown, New York where it currently resides in the downstairs gallery across from the Herb Ritts exhibition.

20190713_165658.jpg

20190713_165646.jpg

The life of Eugene V. Thaw is eloquently reviewed in an obituary written by Holland Carter for the New York Times, which I have included in this post.  It documents a man’s life-long passion for the arts.  His dedication to collecting, amassing more like, and also preserving and selling art is a gift to the world.

20190713_165617.jpg

In this case, American Indian clothing, jewelry, pottery, and both decorative and functional objects depict the powerfully dignified beauty of a culture/civilization.  Although the collection began in the Southwest, the Thaws expanded it to include every region of the US.  The pieces are exquisitely displayed via region.

I am especially drawn to the costume, the leather hides, the intricate beadwork and the colors.  Just fabulous!

Thank you, Mr. & Mrs. Thaw, for your life’s work and vision – preserving American history through the beauty of its art. ❤

The Fenimore Art Museum is open today 10am – 5pm.

5798 STATE HIGHWAY 80 (P.O.BOX 800)
COOPERSTOWN, NY 13326
607-547-1400
INFO@FENIMOREART.ORG

20190713_165717.jpg

20190713_165342.jpg

20190713_165338.jpg

20190713_165249.jpg

20190713_165709.jpg

****From the New York Times website

Eugene V. Thaw, Influential Art Collector and Dealer, Is Dead at 90

By Holland Cotter

January 5, 2018

He was born on Oct. 27, 1927, in Washington Heights in Manhattan. His father was a heating contractor, his mother a schoolteacher. They named him for the socialist leader Eugene Victor Debs, who had died the previous year.

As a young teenager, Mr. Thaw took drawing classes at the Art Students League on West 57th Street in Manhattan. But he did not pursue the hands-on practice of art.

“I can’t create the objects I crave to look at,” he later said, “so I collect them.”

After graduating from DeWitt Clinton High School in the Bronx at 15, he entered St. John’s College in Annapolis, Md., and began making day trips to art museums in nearby Washington.

Returning to New York in 1947, he took graduate classes in art history at Columbia University with Millard Meiss and Meyer Schapiro. He also followed the city’s contemporary-art scene, getting an early immersion in Pollock’s work at the Betty Parsons Gallery.

20190713_165313.jpg

20190713_165507.jpg

20190713_165540.jpg

20190713_165421.jpg

20190713_165418.jpg

***From the Fenimore website

EUGENE AND CLARE THAW: A MEMORIAL TRIBUTE

April 2 – December 31, 2019

Discover the most outstanding items from the Thaw Collection American Indian Art. Objects of transcendent beauty that span the continent—from the Arctic to the Southwest, and from the Eastern Woodlands to the Pacific West–encompassing close to 2,000 years of artistic tradition and innovation in North America.  

 

20190713_165301.jpg

20190713_165650.jpg

 

Advertisements

Come This Way or That Way

20190705_192239.jpg

20190705_190747-1.jpg

The five pieces that make up this whimsical installation by Abraham Ferraro of Albany, New York, are the reason children grow up to be artists.  (What kid didn’t have a sticker collection in the ’80s – am I right, people?)  Arrows wrapped in brightly colored postal tape direct viewers towards this behemoth labyrinth of recycled cardboard and stickers.  You can’t take a bad picture – every angle is perfection.  It is just so incredibly fun!  There is this feeling of discovery, the idea of packages – think Willie Wonka meets Amazon Prime via the U.S. postal service.

20190705_190705.jpg

It is located in the main gallery space at the Schweinfurth Memorial Art Center, the featured items in a three-person show called Made and Remade:  Re-Imaging Industrial Systems and will be on display until August 18, 2019.  The other artists in this exhibit are Landon Perkins of Bentonville, AR and Sherri Lynn Wood of Cincinnati, OH.

20190705_190640.jpg

20190705_190647.jpg

20190705_190627.jpg

Apparently, Ferraro mailed the boxes and arrow-shaped sculptures to the Schweinfurth then added more tape and arranged them to create the eye-popping playground-like display.

20190705_190709.jpg

20190705_190613.jpg

20190705_190718.jpg

Tonight was the gallery’s First Friday event.  In addition to viewing the artwork, browsing the gift shop and enjoying delicious snacks, there was a free re-purposed art project (creating a self-watering planter from a wine bottle) set up in the basement – led by my friend Davana Robedee, Program Coordinator.

IMG_20190705_202341_345.jpg
Michelle DaRin Jewelry, BCBGMaxAzria dress and sandals

The next First Friday will be August 2, 2019.  Edgy Folk will perform.

20190705_190729.jpg

SCHWEINFURTH ART CENTER
(315) 255-1553
205 Genesee Street, Auburn, NY 13021
mail@schweinfurthartcenter.org

HOURS
Tuesday – Saturday: 10am – 5pm
Sunday: 1pm – 5 pm
Closed major holidays and during exhibit installations.

20190705_190712.jpg

20190705_190654.jpg

 

 

Art-5 & Fun

20190523_125833.jpg

It takes my entire lunch period to prep for the class of twenty-three 5th graders – they are here every “A” day during 8th period.  This was yesterday.  Their clay slab/hand-built fish were ready to go home.  I placed an empty Wegman’s bag, along with their sculptures, grade sheets and the packets for the invention project at their seats.  It is organized mayhem, lol.

20190523_125851.jpg

20190523_125909.jpg

I say that in case you think the room is messy, because it is not really mayhem at all.  They are a wonderful group of eleven-year-olds – smart, talented, happy people-pleasers.  I love spending time with them.  I give them a different assigned seat every class, so that they sit with different people each time.  They have to hunt for their seat.  It’s actually kind of fun.

I love how busy they all are in these pictures.  Everyone is completely on task.  The two students looking at the I-pad are checking the spelling of a word (above).  Only three students did not finish their invention drawings, which I will eventually combine to be sent to the high school print department to be made into a coloring book – hopefully by the end of next class.

20190523_125917.jpg

20190523_130008.jpg

They recently finished a landscape illustration using Grant Wood and Grandma Moses as references, and a wood sculpture using Louise Nevelson and Yayoi Kusama as references, as well as the clay fish and the Leonardo daVinci-esque invention.   

20190523_130017.jpg

Next up is a mixed-media lesson referencing Faith Ringgold.  We will add a quilted border to a dreamy drawing.

cropped-cropped-faith-ringgold-and-me-001.jpg

20190523_130118.jpg

Students meet every other day for one semester, which is different than elementary school where students meet once every six day rotation for the entire school year.

Fifth graders started attending Chittenango Middle School (instead of the elementary schools) four years ago. I teach the seventh section of 5th grade (Mrs. Samsel’s class) while my colleague, Joyce Backus, teaches the other six sections (in her own classroom), in addition to teaching all of the Bridgeport Elementary School students.

So fun! ❤

20190523_130220.jpg

20190523_130247.jpg

 

 

Needles & Glue

20190428_170238.jpg

Today, on Orthodox Easter, I did, technically, go to a church.  Kirkland Art Center occupies the architecture of a former house of worship in the quaint town of Clinton, New York ( 9 1/2 East Park Row, Clinton. NY 13323).  The place looks like the set of the naughts TV series Gilmour Girls!  I’d been invited here several times, but this was my first visit to this amazing little venue.

20190428_170225.jpg

Penny had a show there last month, so we took the road trip to get her paintings then stayed for the new exhibit.

20190428_165039.jpg

20190428_161947.jpg

Needles & Glue features the work of mixed media artist Pamela Crockett, sculptor Stephanie Garon and collage artist Steven M. Specht, Ph.D., NCS.  Of the three, only Specht was in attendance today.

20190428_152723.jpg

20190428_152727.jpg

20190428_152733.jpg

Specht, a Psychology professor by day, sold two pieces, which were very reasonably priced.  There is so much satisfaction in these little gems.  Pictures are garnered from vintage magazines then arranged as narrative utilizing techniques he learned in an art course.  The collages are really quite intelligently crafted.

20190428_161239.jpg

20190428_152758.jpg

20190428_201211.jpg

20190428_152842.jpg

20190428_152805.jpg

The exhibition continues through May 24, 2019.  See the website for more information –  hours of operation and future events planned at the center including musical performances and dance! ❤

20190428_152834.jpg

20190428_153105.jpg

20190428_153120.jpg

20190428_152630.jpg

20190428_152636.jpg

20190428_155021.jpg

20190428_155118.jpg

20190428_152549.jpg

20190428_152555.jpg

20190428_152607.jpg

20190428_152615.jpg

20190428_152646.jpg

20190428_152822.jpg

20190428_152859.jpg

20190428_201225.jpg

20190428_152702.jpg

20190428_152909.jpg

IMG_20190428_180451_166.jpg
Rebecca Taylor jumpsuit, Coach bag, Calvin Klein booties

Peek-A-Boo

20190416_131725.jpg

20190416_131710.jpg

2017_contact

20190416_131741.jpg

In the 1950s, the artist Dorothy Reister and her husband purchased land for a summer home in Cazenovia, New York.  They added acres when land became available then turned the place into a sculpture garden, creating hiking trails, as well a sculpture studio attached to their mid-century modern A-frame home.

20190416_134240.jpg

The property transformed into the incorporated non-profit Stone Quarry Hill Art Park, recognized by National Geographic magazine as one of the top sculpture gardens in the nation, and home to permanent and temporary sculptures by such renowned sculptors as Rodger Mack and Emilie Brzezinski.  Now the home and art studio on the property are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  It is open to the public to enjoy.  Today was the perfect day to hike the trails and fall in love with the hidden sculpture gems playing peek-a-boo around every corner.

20190416_131749.jpg

20190416_132009.jpg

20190416_131954.jpg

I am on vacation this week, Spring Break.  I spent a few hours investigating several trails and breathing the fresh air of this space with my high school pal Suzy, who is a fellow teacher.  There was really no one else around – it was a serene and wonderful experience.

20190416_132027.jpg

20190416_132058.jpg

20190416_132134.jpg

I highly recommend coming here, especially if you have kids at home this week and are looking for something to do.  I brought students to Stone Quarry Hill on a school field trip a few years ago and they loved it.  There truly is a surprise around every corner!

20190416_132227.jpg

20190416_132245.jpg

Suggested donation is $5 at the front entrance.  If you wish to donate to the upkeep of the park or volunteer, there is more information on their website – here  

20190416_132345.jpg

20190416_132717.jpg

Several events are upcoming – kite flying, an art exhibition in the indoor space, and a YMCA summer camp experience.  All information is on their website – here.

20190416_132806.jpg

20190416_132825.jpg

20190416_132833.jpg

20190416_133229.jpg

20190416_133350.jpg

20190416_133256.jpg

20190416_133424.jpg

20190416_134031.jpg

20190416_134209.jpg

20190416_133755.jpg

20190416_134314.jpg

20190416_134331.jpg

20190416_134352.jpg

20190416_134415.jpg

20190416_134434-1.jpg

20190416_134443.jpg

20190416_134457.jpg

20190416_134548.jpg

20190416_134557.jpg

20190416_134602.jpg

20190416_134609.jpg

20190416_134646.jpg

20190416_134755.jpg

20190416_134805.jpg

20190416_134831.jpg

20190416_134858.jpg

20190416_134937.jpg

20190416_134959.jpg

20190416_135042.jpg

20190416_135136.jpg

20190416_135244.jpg

20190416_135255.jpg

IMG_20190416_195718_279.jpg

20190416_135427.jpg

20190416_135454.jpg

20190416_135518.jpg

20190416_135548.jpg

20190416_135601.jpg

20190416_135637.jpg

20190416_142052.jpg

315-655-3196

office@stonequarryhillartpark.org

3883 Stone Quarry Rd., P.O. Box 251, Cazenovia, NY 13035

Secret Chamber

20190220_125733.jpg

I have always been drawn to the exquisite beauty of all that is Ancient Egypt.  I took an Egyptology course at University College while teaching at Bryant & Stratton back in the ’80s to answer a student who questioned why and how Egyptian fashion was selected as the first chapter in the costume history textbook.

20190220_125648.jpg

The answer lies in art, because all of our history to do with ancient cultures comes not from the written word, but from pictures – in this case hieroglyphics, tomb murals and, of course jewelry, as well as the remnants of clothing made of linen fiber.

20190220_125615.jpg

I learned that Napoleon’s French army invaded Egypt in 1798.  They rediscovered the antiquities and were the first archeologists to investigate the area.  It wasn’t the painstaking attention to delicate detail that it is today or even remotely a respectful handling of human remains.

20190220_125604.jpg

20190220_125840.jpg

Many mummies were burned as fuel for steam engines, which is just so tragic.  Later on, in the following century, Egypt became an exotic vacation spot for wealthy Americans who enjoyed purchasing the baubles, scarab beetle decor, and mummies!

20190220_125837.jpg

They held mummy unveiling dinner parties back in the States, stuff like that.

20190220_130435.jpg

20190220_125618.jpg

Howard Carter uncovered King Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922.  This significant find catapulted Egyptian archeology in terms of the level of importance, the regard for history and the sheer magic in attaining this priceless treasure.

20190221_113345.jpg

20190220_125629.jpg

Somewhere in the middle, during the Victorian age, Cazenovia Public Library benefactor Robert James Hubbard and his son accumulated a collection of Ancient Egyptian artifacts including an intricately wrapped-in-linen mummy for the purpose of creating a museum.

20190220_125744.jpg

20190220_125303.jpg

And so, yes, there is a mummy in this library.

20190220_125808.jpg

20190220_125309.jpg

Yesterday, Janine and I visited Cazenovia, New York; first stop, Cazenovia Artisans, second, Common Grounds and next, to the library to see this exhibit.  We ended up at Empire Farm Brewery for lunch.  Janine had never been to any of these spots nor had she an idea this breathtaking collection even existed.  So, my thought is that not many of you know about it.  You’re welcome!

20190220_125737.jpg

20190220_125723.jpg

When I taught elementary art at Bridgeport Elementary School in our district, I decided to add a few lessons on Ancient Egypt culture to the third grade curriculum, because I had this knowledge I wanted to share.  I created a cat mummy sculpture lesson.  Naturally, no pets were harmed.  Students’ sculptures were made of an armature of plastic bottles and styrofoam balls.  They were void of remains, unlike the actual cat mummy at this museum.

20190221_091117.jpg

20190221_091135.jpg

20190220_125713.jpg

At Chittenango, it is the sixth graders who study the ancient civilizations in Social Studies.  They do take a field trip to Cazenovia Library, as the village is adjacent to our school district via Route 13.  I highly recommend a visit.  It is free and really quite extraordinary.

20190220_125832.jpg

20190220_125704.jpg

The library is located at 100 Albany Street, Cazenovia, New York 13035.  It is open Monday – Friday 9:00 am – 9:00 pm, Saturday 10:00 – 5:00 pm.  They are closed on Sundays.  Call (315) 655-9322 for more information.

20190220_125658.jpg

20190220_125755.jpg

The museum space is also home to a gallery for rotating local artist/art organization exhibitions, as well as a wonderful exhibit of birds and plumage in fashion.  They also have many interesting activities for children including puzzle clubs and such.  Yesterday they had a hot chocolate and cookie station available.  Set in a Victorian mansion, this is truly a quaint and lovely experience that really packs a secret chamber punch.  So special!  ❤

20190220_125824.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Dozens

20190124_124912.jpg

20190124_124757.jpg

I thought it would be fun to create trompe l’oeil donuts.  We made them from an armature of aluminum foil, paper towels and masking tape.

20190124_124637-1.jpg

20190124_124829.jpg

Students then applied Mod Podge with a brush to paper towel bits, adhering them to the armature.  They really looked like glazed donuts – so cool!

20190118_132317.jpg

20190124_133542.jpg

Cell-u-clay was next.  It is a paper pulp that is applied wet in a sort of oatmeal consistency.  This was the frosting.

20190124_133516.jpg

20190124_133634.jpg

Each student (in two of my 8th grade art classes) created a dozen donuts.  Because I didn’t think six was enough, lol.  They painted the Cell-u-clay with acrylics and added decorative details.

20190124_133553.jpg

20190124_133743.jpg

Some students glued their finished pieces to foamboard and others placed them in boxes provided by the local Dunkin’ Donuts.  The projects are currently on display in the library at Chittenango Middle School, Chittenango, New York.

20190124_133718.jpg

I just loved this project.  I think everyone loved it!  Students in the 9th period B day class even came in during their study hall to become “donut fairies” – they helped the A day group!  Everyone helped each other and it was truly magical.  So fun! ❤

20190124_133808.jpg

20190124_133830.jpg

20190124_133851.jpg

20190124_133911-1.jpg

20190124_133616.jpg