Tag Archives: art for sale

Steely Pam

20190907_122653.jpg

20190907_122650.jpg

20190907_122716.jpg

With a name like Pam Steele, you can bet this internationally recognized artist knows a thing or two about using metallic elements in her artwork.

20190907_122751.jpg

Steele is currently showing work in the art gallery at Community Library of DeWitt & Jamesville (5110 Jamesville Road, Jamesville, New York 13078).

20190907_122706.jpg

20190907_122757.jpg

These mixed-media pieces are made of copper, stainless steel, glass, paint and resins.  They will be on display through October 2019.

20190907_122807.jpg

20190907_122832.jpg

And, P.S., her prices are a steal – some as low as $220!  Contact the artist to make a purchase – steelestudio22@gmail.com

20190907_122842.jpg

20190907_122848.jpg

Contact the library for more information –

Phone: (315) 446-3578
Email: reference@cldandj.org

20190907_122905.jpg

Library Hours

Monday – Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday

*Summer hours:

Saturday
Sunday

Services limited 15 minutes before closing

 

20190907_122918.jpg

20190907_122924.jpg

20190907_122929.jpg

20190907_122946.jpg

20190907_123002.jpg

Advertisements

Scientific Whimsy

20190705_195219.jpg

20190705_201033.jpg

Donna Atwood of Moravia, New York, is a former Science teacher turned full-time professional watercolor artist.  Intuition is her guide.

20190705_195724.jpg

20190705_200010.jpg

20190705_201018.jpg

She applies the watercolors (usually one hue per piece as a starting point) onto a variety of papers. Then she plays with abstractions and visual textures, adding found and household objects – plastic bags, rags, torn window screens – and weights to hold everything down until the next morning.  When she removes the objects, she assesses what she has and begins to deliberate.  She asks her husband what he sees, like a fun Rorschach test game and they laugh at the disparity of their visions.

20190705_195600.jpg

Ultimately, she makes her own decisions about what she sees, as though the paper truly speaks to her alone.  I delighted in her enthusiasm, positivity and passion as she spoke of this process when I met her at the First Friday event last night at Gallery 54 in Skaneateles, New York, where she is the featured artist this month.

20190705_195759.jpg

Once Donna decides on the spirit animal, she goes to work rendering the composition focusing on the eyes.  Tiny details are emphasized, allowing for the animal to disappear into the colorations.  These are paintings that need to be seen in person.  The photographs do not do them justice.  They truly imbibe the artist’s joyful spirit.

20190705_201039.jpg

20190705_195615-1.jpg

Donna Atwood originals and prints are available for sale at Gallery 54 (54 E. Genesee Street, Skaneateles, New York 13152).  If you would like to meet her too, perhaps ask her further questions about her process, Donna will be doing a demonstration at the gallery today (1:00-3:00 pm).  ❤

20190705_201030.jpg

  • Excerpt from the gallery web-site

Even though Atwood was a science education major in college her interest in creating art, which began as a child, continued to flourish. It wasn’t until 2012 that she started practicing watercolor, she says describing her artwork as abstract impression. While she creates her share of surreal landscapes her preference, as the Gallery 54 show will demonstrate is for paintings of animals.

“I decided to create surreal animals and found many different ones lurking in patterns,” she notes. As she describes her work, the backgrounds start out as abstract colors and shapes, but “by manipulating shapes in to eyes, ears and a noses,” she can get the viewer to see” what she sees . . . “the face and body of a creature.”

Atwood is particularly fond of finding animals that are endangered or under represented in artwork generally. Many people, she notes, relate to specific creatures or what she calls “spirit animals.” She likes that viewers of her paintings relate to her whimsical version of “their animal” and that the colors or faces in her paintings make them smile.

“Keeping the background of a painting as untouched as possible allows the animal to grow from it,” she says, adding, “I want to express the presence of the animal, not highlight every hair or whisker.”

Atwood’s work has received awards at the New York State Fair and well as numerous local art exhibits. A resident of Sempronius, NY she has had artwork shown at the Cortland Public Library, the Dryden Community Cafe and the Gilded Lily gallery in Connecticut. Following her show at Gallery 54 she will have an exhibit at the Cortland Guthrie Hospital, from September through November and currently has work displayed at the Tully Artworks Gallery.

20190705_201023.jpg

Gallery 54 July Hours
Monday – Wednesday: 10-5
Thursday, Friday & Saturday: 10-8
Sunday: 10-5

20190705_200402.jpg

20190705_201015.jpg

 

Needles & Glue

20190428_170238.jpg

Today, on Orthodox Easter, I did, technically, go to a church.  Kirkland Art Center occupies the architecture of a former house of worship in the quaint town of Clinton, New York ( 9 1/2 East Park Row, Clinton. NY 13323).  The place looks like the set of the naughts TV series Gilmour Girls!  I’d been invited here several times, but this was my first visit to this amazing little venue.

20190428_170225.jpg

Penny had a show there last month, so we took the road trip to get her paintings then stayed for the new exhibit.

20190428_165039.jpg

20190428_161947.jpg

Needles & Glue features the work of mixed media artist Pamela Crockett, sculptor Stephanie Garon and collage artist Steven M. Specht, Ph.D., NCS.  Of the three, only Specht was in attendance today.

20190428_152723.jpg

20190428_152727.jpg

20190428_152733.jpg

Specht, a Psychology professor by day, sold two pieces, which were very reasonably priced.  There is so much satisfaction in these little gems.  Pictures are garnered from vintage magazines then arranged as narrative utilizing techniques he learned in an art course.  The collages are really quite intelligently crafted.

20190428_161239.jpg

20190428_152758.jpg

20190428_201211.jpg

20190428_152842.jpg

20190428_152805.jpg

The exhibition continues through May 24, 2019.  See the website for more information –  hours of operation and future events planned at the center including musical performances and dance! ❤

20190428_152834.jpg

20190428_153105.jpg

20190428_153120.jpg

20190428_152630.jpg

20190428_152636.jpg

20190428_155021.jpg

20190428_155118.jpg

20190428_152549.jpg

20190428_152555.jpg

20190428_152607.jpg

20190428_152615.jpg

20190428_152646.jpg

20190428_152822.jpg

20190428_152859.jpg

20190428_201225.jpg

20190428_152702.jpg

20190428_152909.jpg

IMG_20190428_180451_166.jpg
Rebecca Taylor jumpsuit, Coach bag, Calvin Klein booties

Sweet Alley

20190330_212558.jpg

20190330_214302.jpg

20190330_213029.jpg

Tony Thompson’s closing reception was last night.  He’d been showing his artwork at Kasai Ramen, 218 Walton Street, Syracuse, New York 13203 for two months.  I decided to go and it was the first time I’d been to this location in twenty-six years!  OMG.  It used to be Sweet Baba’s, the very first place I exhibited my own art.  I was the house artist for a while – I don’t remember how long, but it was the place where I sold my first painting, which led to a commission.  Fond memories.

20190330_214518.jpg

20190330_214343.jpg

20190330_214454.jpg

The restaurant itself is a work of art.  It was built in the alley between two buildings.  The Walton Street entrance boasts a cozy bar area and some seating.  There are three staircases, one a spiral, that lead to a lower level filled with the ambiance of brick walls, dark lighting and the dance of kitchen staff preparing asian fusion meals to perfection.

20190330_214350.jpg

20190330_214547.jpg

“Kasai Ramen is a 100 seat, two level restaurant. Its menu features traditional Ramen and Izakaya dishes with a Salt City attitude. Featuring superior service and exceptional quality food in an electric fast paced atmosphere Kasai is the restaurant to dine at in Armory Square. Come enjoy an order of Pork Gyoza, Shrimp Steam Buns, Shoyu Ramen and a Whole Roasted Duck!”

20190330_215435.jpg

20190330_213053.jpg

20190330_214243.jpg

Thompson is a Syracuse bred artist currently living in Utica, New York.  He exhibits regionally and is part of the graffiti/tattoo stable of artists led by my friend Jamie Santos.  These thirty somethings have commandeered the art scene here with many cool-themed pop-up shows and curated group restaurant gigs under their young hipster belts.

20190330_214535.jpg

20190330_214359.jpg

20190330_214404.jpg

20190330_214419.jpg

The work here is cohesive.  Thompson uses found object canvases – discarded windows, old cabinets and wood scraps.  His work is a narrative of the inner workings of his mind.  Portraits that bring to mind a Basquiat quality with competent, confident line quality that belies his mostly self-taught status.  The other imagery appears like a nightmare jutxaposed with sweet child-like innocence.  My favorite pieces are the glass ones.  They are a fun marriage of old and new, the window allowing the viewer to, sort of, see into the artist’s engagingly energetic mind.

20190330_214529.jpg

20190330_214525.jpg

20190330_213040.jpg

Next up for the restaurant is a show by Jamie and beyond that, a curated Japanese-themed one that I may be a part of.  I am immersed in Japanese art and culture right now with four of my classes using Hokusai and other wood block print references, so it may be up my alley. (Get it?  Because Kasai Ramen is built in an alley….)

20190330_214502.jpg

20190330_214410.jpg

Find Tony Thompson on Facebook.

20190330_215424.jpg

20190330_215513.jpg

Commonality

20190322_194223.jpg

20190322_194226.jpg

There is a small gallery to the right of the entrance at Schweinfurth Memorial Art Center in Auburn, New York, called the Gallery Julius.  It is a space reserved primarily for emerging regional artists who send work to the art center’s curator for consideration.

20190322_194243.jpg

Common Places is the current exhibition: photographs by Willson Cummer of Fayetteville, New York, taken while on hiking excursions to parks near his home.  He and his wife are kindred spirits, the term for people I meet on the road-less-travelled sections of the trails at Green Lakes State Park.  We have that in common.

20190322_194233.jpg

These photographs also have sunshine in common, and a sense of serenity and timelessness.  There are ten similarly-sized and framed photographs in this show, all priced at $650.

20190322_194349.jpg

Artist Statement

These photographs are from my project called Common Places. I use a few word plays to develop the concept. First, I made these images in parks — places held in common, set aside from private development. Also, these pictures are of unremarkable places. While I love to climb in the Adirondacks this work is about common parks near my home in Fayetteville, New York. Finally, I am interested in the use — primarily in the 1700s — of the commonplace, a scrapbook of sorts in which people collected stimulating quotes, letters and printed items. These pictures are my commonplace. 

20190322_194250.jpg

All current spring exhibitions will be on display until May 12, 2019.  The Schweinfurth is open Tuesday-Saturday 10 am – 5 pm and Sunday 1 pm – 5 pm.  Admission is $7 and free for exhibiting artists, members and children.

Best Intentions

20190220_121612.jpg

20190220_122957.jpg

Janine and I took a trip to Cazenovia, New York today.  We visited Cazenovia Artisans, an artist’s co-op.  It is located at 39 Albany Street in the heart of the village.  Linda Bigness just joined, so I thought it would be fun to visit and see the new work. (For a full list of artists in the cooperative, visit their website).

20190220_121633.jpg

Bob Ripley was manning the register.  He is a former Advertising Design man turned full time watercolorist.  His work is AMAZING!

20190220_121621.jpg

20190220_121617.jpg

20190220_121607.jpg

It was such an honor to meet him and speak with him about his art.  Bob uses Windsor & Newton watercolors and Arches 300 pound paper, which he staples into foam board while working on the individual pieces.

20190220_122054.jpg

20190220_120548.jpg

Bob shared his technique – here he is working on a commission.  He added the figure of the man into the landscape and strategically placed the fishing line to add rhythm to the composition.

20190220_120622.jpg

He uses frisket to assist in the layering process of glazing.  It stops the paint from bleeding into areas and also helps to save the white of the paper, which is a watercolor technique used instead of painting with the more opaque Chinese white paint.  In addition, he shared a method he’d perfected through trial and error – placing clear transparent tape on an area then going back in and shaving the edge with an Exacto blade to match it with the landscape, all to insure that the paint stays where it belongs.

20190220_121600.jpg

20190220_121555.jpg

Watercolor is tricky that way.  It is about sheer layers blending together.  Bob was very clear about never using black.  Instead, he combines Hooker’s Green and Alizarin Crimson or if he wants a cooler looking dark, he mixes the Alizarin with Ultramarine Blue.

20190220_121551.jpg

This work is really incredible.  Each piece takes about seventy or eighty hours to complete.  Bob draws the basic lines of the landscape then adds more detail with pencil as needed.

20190220_121547.jpg

20190220_121511.jpg

20190220_121532.jpg

There are original watercolor paintings on the wall for sale, as well as high quality Giclee prints, which look almost identical to the originals in quality and color.  Each piece is infused with Bob Ripley’s vivacious spirit.  He is so talented!

20190220_121527.jpg

20190220_121524.jpg

20190220_122544.jpg

20190220_122522.jpg

Thank you, Bob Ripley!!!  And thank you, Janine Hudun, for joining me.  We also popped over to the Cazenovia Public Library to visit their museum and gallery (blog to follow) then had lunch at Empire Farm Brewery.

I privately set an intention this morning – I wanted to see a cardinal, believe it or not.  People always say that when a cardinal crosses your path, it is a sign that someone who has passed away is nearby.  I was sifting through Bob’s prints thinking I might see one (I can’t explain why I thought he would even have one). Then I turned and found a cardinal print in his section on the greeting card fixture!

Later that day, I saw an actual cardinal while hiking around Green Lakes.  It literally called out to me then it frantically fluttered about while I flustered getting my cell phone from my pocket.  I was laughing and crying at the same time while trying to get the shot, so this is not a great picture, lol, but it doesn’t matter.  Thanks, Dad. ❤

20190220_171601.jpg

Cazenovia Artisans is open Monday – Saturday 10:00 am – 5:00 pm and Sunday 10:00 am – 4:00 pm.  For more information call (315) 655-2225.

Art in Hospital

After the Happy Little Tree House art reception on Tuesday, Brandon Hall took Karmin and me to see his other hospital exhibition.  It is in the cancer center wing of Upstate Medical Center and will be up for a couple months, I think, or at least until the end of May.

20180424_181752

20180424_181741

20180424_181808

Brandon is an art teacher at Fayetteville-Manlius High School.  He scours flea markets and garage sales to find discarded photograph albums and situates these unknown strangers into wallpapered assemblage landscapes peppered with texture and color.  They are mounted on wood and double-lacquered to prevent fading.  They are really exquisite and priced at only $250!

20180424_181800

Also in this show are Heidi VanTassel’s photography and paintings by Kate Renetta.

20180424_171047

20180424_171055

20180424_171104

20180424_181704

20180424_171127

20180424_181715