Category Archives: art gallery

School Fair 2019

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Tonight’s the night for the annual Chittenango School Fair at Chittenango High School (150 Genesee Street, Chittenango, NY 13037).  It takes place from 5:30 – 8:00 pm.  This is my display – set up in the hallway between the two gyms.

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Needles & Glue

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Today, on Orthodox Easter, I did, technically, go to a church.  Kirkland Art Center occupies the architecture of a former house of worship in the quaint town of Clinton, New York ( 9 1/2 East Park Row, Clinton. NY 13323).  The place looks like the set of the naughts TV series Gilmour Girls!  I’d been invited here several times, but this was my first visit to this amazing little venue.

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Penny had a show there last month, so we took the road trip to get her paintings then stayed for the new exhibit.

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Needles & Glue features the work of mixed media artist Pamela Crockett, sculptor Stephanie Garon and collage artist Steven M. Specht, Ph.D., NCS.  Of the three, only Specht was in attendance today.

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Specht, a Psychology professor by day, sold two pieces, which were very reasonably priced.  There is so much satisfaction in these little gems.  Pictures are garnered from vintage magazines then arranged as narrative utilizing techniques he learned in an art course.  The collages are really quite intelligently crafted.

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The exhibition continues through May 24, 2019.  See the website for more information –  hours of operation and future events planned at the center including musical performances and dance! ❤

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Rebecca Taylor jumpsuit, Coach bag, Calvin Klein booties

Cancel That

Currently, three venues are hosts to the twenty-four Syracuse University MFA candidates: Point of Contact Gallery, Community Folk Art Center and the SU Art Galleries. The art reception at POC was last Friday (that show continues through May 10, 2019), the one at CFA will be Thursday, April 18, 2019 from 5:30 – 7:30 pm (show continues through May 11, 2019). Last night at the Shaffer Hall venue, I attended the art reception for eleven of these students.

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What I love about Thursday evening art openings on campus – you can drive right up to the gate and park for free in the Q-4 lot – easy-peasy! It was such a beautiful evening. The university is a reoccurring landscape in my life. I really love being there. I received my BFA and MS degrees from Syracuse. I did not get an MFA, which I guess I would need if I am ever to be considered for a job as an Art Professor at SU (the Art Education masters is a Masters of Science for whatever reason, which is weird). A series of questions answered in essay format served as my thesis and not a gallery showcase of artwork, as is the case in these recent exhibitions.

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The students have varied focuses – illustration, painting and digital art, for example. Apparently, the cohesive thread of this work, according to the curator’s statement, is to do with the artist’s responses to their current realities and the angst that resides there be it via monstrous nightmare, political climate, gender issues, or social injustices, or some combination of junk that creates a response to conditions. The artists in this particular show seem to be attempting to express views, beliefs, fears and perceived truths in a sort of thinking man’s artist thing-a-ma-gig.

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Nothing tickled me here – true story – and that could just be because I am so not their generation, (kids these days, am I right? lol) and because I am a happiness-and-joy girl. I am perplexed by the need to be conditional about anything. I trust that everything unfolds when you are true to yourself, creating a vision that exposes yourself in a vulnerable way, perhaps, allowing your inner being to guide you towards the inspiration that will captivate. You feel it in your soul and that beauty that is within becomes your art and it subsequently resonates with the world. You will know it, your friends will know it, your professors will know it and you will see how incredibly it will take you where you want to go, easily and effortlessly.

So where do these kids see themselves? A conversation with some professors indicated that student art direction these days is focused on thinking about rather than the executing of ideas. This is not something I really understand. Are they not happy?

Are they hoping to open a dialogue about negative stuff? I don’t know. Some of this work is on the rather provocative side in the way that I cannot bring my thirteen-year-old students to this gallery on a field trip. There is some adult content of a sexual nature, as well as pieces that draw attention to violence and horror.

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Let’s cancel all that.

I guess I don’t agree with the blurb sentiment “sober examination of the facts”. We create our own realities based on dreams and desires. Choosing to get caught up in something you don’t want or don’t like just does not make sense to me. If I create a reality I don’t want, I don’t choose to stay there and dwell in it, complain about it and get stuck there. And I don’t really think it is the blanket statement under which all of these artists sleep, is it? Or is Plans are Cancelled a reference to a positive re-boot?

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The fun for me are these questions, not in the answers because the questions alone allowed me to ponder solutions of my own with regard to my own life. I am grateful for this show because I had really satisfying conversations with my friends Penny and Davana about this show and about how it can help us define/re-define ourselves as artists and teachers.

And it was also so helpful to share what I saw here with my Studio in Art students. It is so important to me as a teacher that I offer guidance in the form of training my students to trust and believe in themselves, to know that they will be able to navigate their path to whatever they care to do artistically in the future with or without me.

I wish these MFA candidates the best of luck and love in their creative journeys. I sincerely thank you all for your perspectives. ❤

Plans are Cancelled will remain on display until May 12, 2019.

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***Artists represented at Syracuse University Art Galleries

Hollie Lyko, E. Garrett Bryant, Perry Burlingame, Jestina Sutherland, Rebecca Forstater, Sylvie Prendergast-Corvo, Samantha Corbett, Louise Thompson, Jason Cheney, Mark Zbikowski, Jiallin Deng

I See Deb Walsh

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“Eye Studio Arts, LLC is featuring the work of artist Deborah Walsh during the month of April. Walsh is known for her acrylic paintings of reflections on shiny surfaces, most often cars, motorcycles, chrome, and glass. Her work is about how light and color is diffused and reflected on various surfaces creating repetition, variation, pattern and rhythm.
Walsh graduated with a BFA in Painting and MS in Art Education from SU. As a retired Liverpool art teacher, she says her students she taught inspired her for more than 30 years. Her work has been included in Central New York Regional and National juried shows as well as many one-woman and group exhibitions. Private collectors throughout the United States own and commission work.
The Artist Reception, April 12th, will feature an acoustic performance by Caleb Liber, food and beverages and an opportunity to meet the artist.” (from the art exhibition Facebook page)

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I stopped into Eye Studio this evening – once again I missed the art reception by about twenty-four hours and ten minutes.  But, yes, I was there.  The art studio is a place for ceramics, glassware, and drawing and painting classes for all ages and ability levels.  There is a gift shoppe in the front room and two adjacent gallery spaces with the classrooms in the roomy back space.

My encaustic angel show was up at this time last year.  It is a wonderful gallery space and Walsh’s work is spectacular.  This art is highly collectible!  I can see how the car motif resonates with so many people – from color to model and make.  It is the kind of thing tailor-made for home décor.  Walsh’s prices are quite reasonable for her originals and there are also Giclée prints available that are of incredible quality.

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Deb Walsh has been painting shiny, reflective-surfaced items for almost thirty years.  She gravitates to vehicles, but is currently also finding that this style works well with silver tea-sets and glassware.

Here is her artist statement from the Saatchi art website:

About Deborah Walsh

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The work will be on display until April 30, 2019.

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See the website for more information including hours of operation and pricing (here).

 

Commonality

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There is a small gallery to the right of the entrance at Schweinfurth Memorial Art Center in Auburn, New York, called the Gallery Julius.  It is a space reserved primarily for emerging regional artists who send work to the art center’s curator for consideration.

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Common Places is the current exhibition: photographs by Willson Cummer of Fayetteville, New York, taken while on hiking excursions to parks near his home.  He and his wife are kindred spirits, the term for people I meet on the road-less-travelled sections of the trails at Green Lakes State Park.  We have that in common.

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These photographs also have sunshine in common, and a sense of serenity and timelessness.  There are ten similarly-sized and framed photographs in this show, all priced at $650.

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Artist Statement

These photographs are from my project called Common Places. I use a few word plays to develop the concept. First, I made these images in parks — places held in common, set aside from private development. Also, these pictures are of unremarkable places. While I love to climb in the Adirondacks this work is about common parks near my home in Fayetteville, New York. Finally, I am interested in the use — primarily in the 1700s — of the commonplace, a scrapbook of sorts in which people collected stimulating quotes, letters and printed items. These pictures are my commonplace. 

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All current spring exhibitions will be on display until May 12, 2019.  The Schweinfurth is open Tuesday-Saturday 10 am – 5 pm and Sunday 1 pm – 5 pm.  Admission is $7 and free for exhibiting artists, members and children.

Spring Made

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McEvoy, Chris, Oswego, NY, “Inside/Out and In-between, 2018, acrylic, ink, paper on panel, $4,500

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Callahan, Nancy, Gilbertsville, NY, “The Household Physician”, 2017, wood, metal, glass, found object, $6,000

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The latest incarnation of the Made in New York show at Schweinfurth Memorial Art Center in Auburn, New York opened last night.  It runs through May 12, 2019.  This is a juried exhibition.  This year Anne Novado and Marie Via selected the pieces.

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Alonzo, Jerry, Geneseo, NY, “3 Birds”, 2018, wood, milk paint, steel and brass, $700
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Van Hoven, James, West Monroe, NY, “November Maple”, 2018, charcoal on paper, $1,500
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Skvarch, James, Syracuse, NY, “Conspiracy”, 2019, Charcoal on Paper, $3,000

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Russotti, Patricia, Rochester, NY, “Medicine Wheel”, 2017, Kozo archival inkjet with cold wax, $800

Sixty artists (all of whom are New York state residents) are included here.  The work is in the gallery’s Main Gallery space, which includes several smaller rooms within the space.  The overall theme seemed to be one of nature and the idea that spring is in the air.  I saw predominately yellows and oranges in color palettes, and a number of pieces with trees, as well as birds and bees as subject matter.

It is currently spring in New York, so this does make sense, although no one told Mother Nature, who decided to smack us with blizzard-like conditions for the drive home.

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Bialke, Audrey, Trumansburg, NY, “Strange Hunger”, 2018, oil on Arches oil paper, $320
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Rodrigues, John, Vestal, NY, “Balance”, 2017, oil on panel, $1,000
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Zografos, Despina, Garden City, NY, “StrolleropteraTripthych#5”, 2018, hand cut paper, foamboard, chipboard, $3,800

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Several artists received monetary prizes for their work including John Fitzsimmons who received Best in Show for his oil painting titled “The Voices of Those” (below left).

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Fitzsimmons, John, Syracuse, NY, “The Voices of Those” and “Smoke Through the Trees”, 2018, oil on canvas, $2,300 each

Other winners included David Higgins, First Prize for “Loomis” (below), Stefan Zoller, Second Prize for “Skeletal Trees”, Russell Serrianne, Juror’s Choice for “Continuum”, and Faithanne Flesher, Juror’s Choice for “Floodfires”.

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Higgins, David, Corning, NY, “Loomis”, 2016, oil on panel, $3,000
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Newton, Diane, Ithaca, NY, “Early Morning/Nashville, 2017, pastel on black Arches paper, $3,000
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Mort, Kyle, North Syracuse, NY, “Low Battery”, 2019, watercolor, $400
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Rehrig, Kathryn, Marcellus, NY, “Faded Beauties”, 2018, photography, NFS
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Shute, Eric, Marcellus, NY, “Cow Shed: Filmore Glen”, 2018, watercolor, $700

The gallery is hosting several events during this exhibition.  On Saturday, April 27, 2019, Stefan Zoller will demonstrate an image transfer technique and on Saturday, May 11, 2019, Sally Hootnick will demonstrate working with wax.  Both presentations will begin at 1:00 pm on their respective dates.  Other events:  First Friday celebrations on Friday, April 5, 2019 and Friday, May 3, 2019, and several educational activities.  See their website for more details here.  We are heading into better, non-white-knuckle driving conditions, which will make the trip to Auburn (about 40 minutes from Syracuse) a satisfying one.  It is sunny with dry roads as we speak (read: as I write).

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Arnold, Robin, New Paltz, NY, “Safesecurevital”, 2016, oil on canvas, $1,600
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Groat II, Hal, Endwell, NY, “Thief of the Past and Future”, 2017, oil on canvas, $2,500

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There is more art too.  The upstairs gallery is the temporary home of Double Vision, paintings by Pennie Brantley and Robert Morgan.  Willson Cummer’s photography show, titled Common Places, currently occupies the Gallery Julius.

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Hutchinson, Cheryl, Syracuse, NY, “Namaste”, 2019, ceramic, $495
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Schwartzman, Marcie, Cooperstown, NY, “Large folded vessel with grommets” and “Swirl double vessel”, 2018, stoneware and mixed media, $500 and $400
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VanArsdale, Margaret, Perry, NY, “34th and 8th”, 2019, up-cycle plastic, $1,000
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Piedmonte, Allison, Cato, NY, “Every Loved One I Never Would Have Met”, 2018, digital image on fabric, thread, $600
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Frutiger, Karen, Rochester, NY, “The Shortest Day”, 2018, acrylic, collage, cheesecloth on watercolor paper, $750

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(left) Sardisco, Karen, Rochester, NY, “Night Vision”, 2018, acrylic on canvas, $2,800 (right) Gabriel, Kathryn, Manlius, NY “Diafem Solid”, 2018, watercolor, gouche, charcoal on paper, $1,400
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Gohringer, Judith, Rochester, NY, “Summer Noon”, 2018, acrylic, $400
***Artists included in this exhibition
Jerry Alonzo, Robin Arnold, Patricia Bacon, Audrey Bialke, Bridget Bossart van Otterloo, Andrea Buckvold, Nancy Callahan,Stephen Carlson, Daniel Chadwick, Linda Cohen, Bradley Cole, Christopher Cook, Cynthia Cratsley, Stephen Datz, Scott Deyett, Constance Ehindero, John Fitzsimmons, Faithanne Flesher, Karen Frutiger, Kathryn Gabriel, Judith Gohringer, Hall Groat II, David Higgins, Sally Hootnick, Stephen Horne, Cheryl Hutchinson, Barbara Kellogg, Nancy Kieffer, Russell King, Robert Licht, Barry Lobdell, Chris McEvoy, Michael Morgan, Kyle Mort, Diane Newton, Avani Patel, Allison Piedmonte, Judith Plotner, Rose Marie Popper, Eva Redamonti, Kathryn Rehrig, Michele Riche, John Rodrigues, Patricia Russotti, Karen Sardisco, Marcie Schwartzman, Russell Serrianne, Eric Shute, James Skvarch, Ahree Song, Steven Specht, Bryan Valentine Thomas, Kate Timm, Michele Vair, James Van Hoven, Margaret VanArsdale, Heidi Vantassel, Anna Warfield, David Werberig, Despina Zografos, Stefan Zoller

 

The Art of Fluidity

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Penny, Janine and I attended the Pop-up Video Installation and Performing Art exhibition at Apostrophe’s this evening.  (1100 Oak Street, Syracuse, New York)  It was a three-hour event.  Artist Yilu Yang from Shanghai, China is currently a graduate student in the Department of Transmedia at Syracuse University.

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Her show was titled Subconsciously Flowing Water.  Yilu’s interest in nature stems from a yearning to seek its innate tranquility, a sanctuary from the contemporary man-made life-in-the-fast-lane that has been her experience growing up in a big city.  Her films are self-portraits, depicting herself creating narratives that represent an intimacy with water, sand and the landscape of Earth while also acknowledging the customs, poetry and history of her heritage.

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Her colleagues, fellow students and friends gathered for a critique led by Laura Heyman, Associate Professor in the Department of Transmedia and D.J. Hellerman, Curator of Art & Programs at the Everson Museum of Art.  The Everson has one of the largest collections of Video Art in the nation (who knew?) and so, the museum works closely with the university to promote and guide students in their respective artistic journeys.

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Heyman asked what direction she felt her art was going, other than to be viewed in this gallery space?  Yilu Yang remained poised as she answered.  Her audience ventured closer to hear her soft spoken response.  She was clear in her vision, that her work is both personal and universal in that it allows the viewer to ponder the peaceful inner being while questioning their place in society.  It may become more political or not, depending on where it takes her – back to China or on an extended path around the world.

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I see it as the beauty in escape – that we can all benefit from unplugging from society and focusing on creating our own imaged histories, rewriting our realities and then revisiting ourselves in the physical.  In this way, we seek and find our true happiness.

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I see a lot of wonderful things in Yilu’s future.  She found a fit with Syracuse and with the United States – mainly, the freedom to express her vision with determined fluidity. ❤

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