Tag Archives: photography exhibition

Commonality

20190322_194223.jpg

20190322_194226.jpg

There is a small gallery to the right of the entrance at Schweinfurth Memorial Art Center in Auburn, New York, called the Gallery Julius.  It is a space reserved primarily for emerging regional artists who send work to the art center’s curator for consideration.

20190322_194243.jpg

Common Places is the current exhibition: photographs by Willson Cummer of Fayetteville, New York, taken while on hiking excursions to parks near his home.  He and his wife are kindred spirits, the term for people I meet on the road-less-travelled sections of the trails at Green Lakes State Park.  We have that in common.

20190322_194233.jpg

These photographs also have sunshine in common, and a sense of serenity and timelessness.  There are ten similarly-sized and framed photographs in this show, all priced at $650.

20190322_194349.jpg

Artist Statement

These photographs are from my project called Common Places. I use a few word plays to develop the concept. First, I made these images in parks — places held in common, set aside from private development. Also, these pictures are of unremarkable places. While I love to climb in the Adirondacks this work is about common parks near my home in Fayetteville, New York. Finally, I am interested in the use — primarily in the 1700s — of the commonplace, a scrapbook of sorts in which people collected stimulating quotes, letters and printed items. These pictures are my commonplace. 

20190322_194250.jpg

All current spring exhibitions will be on display until May 12, 2019.  The Schweinfurth is open Tuesday-Saturday 10 am – 5 pm and Sunday 1 pm – 5 pm.  Admission is $7 and free for exhibiting artists, members and children.

Advertisements

Newbie

20180423_190902

20180423_190907

Photographer Laura Thorne is new in town.  The former Tampa, Florida resident is having her first art exhibition at Dolce Vita World Bistro, 907 East Genesee Street, Syracuse, New York.  The show will be up until May 19, 2018.

20180423_191124

20180423_191141

See more of Laura’s photographs on her website www.laurathornephotography.com.

20180423_191258

Here is the information from the Facebook page:

Dolce Vita presents… PerspectiVe Changes Everything, a showcase of some of Laura Thorne’s most unique and compelling photography from around the world and in Syracuse.

Donate to Believe in Syracuse by May 18th to enter a drawing to win a framed 11 x 14 print. For each dollar donated to the Creativity Crates Project fund you will receive one wanted. IE $5 = 5 chances to win.
https://mailchi.mp/192c738f9f9f/enter-to-win-an-11-x-14-framed-print-by-laura-thorne-of-absolute-revolution-gallery

20180423_191315

20180423_191332

20180423_190911

20180423_191121

20180423_191309

20180423_191323

20180423_190802

Seeing the Light

At the artist reception on Wednesday night at Light Work, I fell in love.  Yes!  This is something that I seem to do easily lately.  I am in love with life, so what can I do?

In this case, the objects of my affection are Ben Altman’s photographs, which are hanging in the hallway of this beautiful venue (316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse, NY).  They will be there until July 22, 2016, if you want to see them in person.

Ben

Here is a link  to the whole shebang on the Light Work website –

20160323_190111

Altman uses an old-fashioned camera to take photographs of people using their cell phones to photograph memorial sites around the world.  He is sort of a voyeur looking over the shoulders of these tourists to create images that have an eerie-beauty to them.  The memorial site is blurred but we can see a part of it through the tourists’ viewfinders.

So, you kind of say – ohhh, that’s pretty – then you read the title and you are looking at a picture taken at Auschwitz or one taken at the site of the Oklahoma bombing.  It is just this startling feeling of, like, OMG, I just thought a place of utter sadness was so beautiful.  Then you feel totally weird for liking it.  So you go back and look again with the new knowledge and feel super weird, because it is still so hauntingly beautiful.

And by you, I mean me.

20160323_190146

What a profound experience.  The photos are very large.  They are all the same size, framed the same way, which alerts us to the fact that they are equally important.  I just love the concept, the follow through, the process of capturing frame-in-frame shots that are all different, yet remain in harmony.

Here is his artist statement –

“Tourists at iconic sights almost automatically photograph with their smart-phones and cameras. This act becomes more complicated at memorials, sites, and museums that commemorate episodes of mass violence. Over the past few years I have photographed visitors and their screens at many such places. The people in my images are strangers who are mostly unaware of my intention, even though I use a hand-held 1940’s 4×5 press camera. My vintage equipment fits well with thinking about the present in terms of the past.

“Raising a device between oneself and a site of atrocity can be seen as distancing and reductive. However an impulse to manage and diffuse what these places mean is understandable and perhaps necessary. Often the memorials themselves depict the appalling, chaotic events they represent with unwarranted coherence or with the blankness of preserved artifacts. They invite engagement but also obstruct it. The memorials and the photography each suggest questions: how to see these sites; how to empathize with the unknowable experiences of the people who were caught up in the events; how to understand the ways in which past horrors configure our present world; how to live with our knowledge.

— Ben Altman, March 2016″

20160323_190202

20160323_190117

When I was in Jersey City, NJ, I took a picture at the memorial they have honoring the New Jersey residents who died in the Twin Towers.  It is two walls of granite with names on each side and when you walk through towards the waterfront, the Freedom Tower sits between them in your sight line.  It is an emotional experience to stand there and witness.  As a tourist, I took a picture exactly the way Ben Altman explained in his statement.  But my photographs contain my own reflection. I guess in this way, I become one with my empathy and that is a good thing.  Altman’s detachment invites the viewer inside in a way that allows us to see the light of beauty in darkness.

20160313_133757

20160313_133801

For more information on Ben Altman, find his website here.

 

Captive Audience

20150901_105941

DSC_0195

Every year I install art exhibitions in the Chittenango Middle School library in Chittenango, New York.  I seek out professional artists in the region – four per year as follows:  September – November/Thanksgiving-ish, November – February/Winter break, February – April/Spring Break, and April – June.

DSC_0273

It’s a captive audience scenario.  They go into the school library to get books, use the computer, take classes, have a study hall…and in addition, they are subliminally bombarded with art/aesthetics and all around good taste.

20150908_105322

They are the very people artists target – students who can learn to appreciate art at a young age and become life-long patrons of the arts – as artists themselves, hobbyists or consumers who appreciate…or all of the above!

20150908_105207

20150908_105106

Steve Pearlman is my current artist-in-residence with fifteen photographs showcasing his interest in Syracuse, travel, fashion and an amazing eye for contrast, composition and perspective.

DSC_3922

DSC_7877 - Version 2 (1)

DSCF0018

He will give an artist talk to students during our after school time/tenth period (2:20-2:50 pm) on Tuesday, October 27, 2015. I’m sure he will share what he told me – that aside from his family, he has no greater love than the love he feels while holding his camera, pointing the lens and capturing a unique image that freezes time.  Art is sometimes the most beautiful gift you can give to yourself.  When I spend time talking to other artists about their contributions including hopes and dreams for themselves, it really feels amazing – we are more similar than different with regard to the love of creating.

DSC_2846 - Version 3

DSCF0338

I was just talking about this with my students yesterday.  The importance of emotion as a component in a work of art.  It is always the hope that students will make these connections to their own lives in order to be happier, and in order to lead supercalifragilistic artistic futures.

DSC_2316

DSC_1347 - Version 2_2 (1)

DSC_0195

DSC_0068